Definition of monody in English:

monody

Pronunciation /ˈmänədē/ /ˈmɑnədi/

nounmonodies

  • 1An ode sung by a single actor in a Greek tragedy.

    ‘I've mentioned the Easter monodies glowingly sung by Catherine King.’
    • ‘Many times, and particularly when combined with texts, the melodies are presented as extended monodies, carefully controlled so that Messiaen's words can be clearly heard.’
    • ‘Its regretful, transfiguring ending, built out of a wonderfully orchestral monody, is remarkable, and the clarity of the textures is quite startling.’
  • 2A poem lamenting a person's death.

    lament, dirge, requiem, elegy, funeral chant, funeral song, burial hymn, dead march, keen, plaint, knell
  • 3Music with only one melodic line, especially an early Baroque style with one singer and continuo accompaniment.

    ‘the Italian masters of monody’
    • ‘Percussion and even the early harp played no part in the great development from monody to polyphony.’
    • ‘For me, one of its most interesting quotations was when he was introducing monody and the transition into the baroque.’
    • ‘Among the different vocal and instrumental styles that characterise the medieval period, monody plays an essential part.’

Origin

Early 17th century via late Latin from Greek monōdia, from monōdos ‘singing alone’.