Definition of month in English:

month

noun

  • 1

    (also calendar month)
    Each of the twelve named periods into which a year is divided.

    ‘the first six months of 1992’
    ‘it was the end of the month’
    • ‘I changed the calendar month to July as I walked past the bulletin board.’
    • ‘The second full Moon in a calendar month is sometimes called a blue moon.’
    • ‘A blue moon is the second full moon in a calendar month.’
    • ‘Since there are 29.5 days between full moons, the occurrence of a second full moon in a calendar month is not a very regular phenomenon.’
    • ‘Rather, the term blue moon refers to the second full moon in a calendar month, which occurred on Saturday.’
    • ‘Your bonds are entered into the monthly prize draws once you have held them for a full calendar month, so anyone wanting to enter the August draw (the first with two £1 million jackpots) must have bought before the end of June.’
    • ‘Generate at least 30 subscriptions in a calendar month and they'll pay an extra 75% per subscription.’
    • ‘Those who wish to continue paying off their debt interest-free will need to apply to transfer the remaining balance to another card at least a full calendar month before the end of their current deal.’
    • ‘We are in the third calendar month of industrial action and I would rather members who were half-hearted about what we are trying to achieve voted against industrial action.’
    • ‘As well as searching for low fares on specific dates, it will show the range of fares between two cities for every day in a particular calendar month.’
    • ‘It being close to the end of the calendar month, my reserves of local currency are running a little low.’
    • ‘These are a selection of articles that appeared in this calendar month in other years.’
    • ‘I have recorded eggs laid by birds under my care in every calendar month of the year.’
    • ‘it stated that accommodation had been charged for at the rate of $2200 per calendar month.’
    • ‘At the end of last year, 185 employees were on long-term sick leave, classified as an absence of one calendar month or longer.’
    • ‘Subsequently the Committee met and determined that the rent for the property was £2,708 per calendar month or in other words £32, 496 per annum.’
    • ‘The agreed licence fee was £460 per calendar month.’
    • ‘I work for eight hours per week, doing two four hour sessions for which I receive the minimum wage resulting in £137.60 per calendar month.’
    • ‘You will be paid a basic salary of £4,000 per annum, payable in arrears, on the last working Friday of each calendar month.’
    • ‘The rent reserved by the Tenancy Agreement was expressed to be £1, 400 per calendar month.’
    • ‘Muslims are required to fast during Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar.’
    • ‘I've been on my own for the first six months of the year and I've worked every day on my own to try and get fit.’
    • ‘Of note is the rise in mean minimum temperatures for January, the coolest month of the year.’
    • ‘Spring is finally here, and the best six months of the year have finally begun.’
    • ‘Mr O'Brien expects to see January's sales double those of the same month last year.’
    • ‘The first few months of the new year are not the best time to move, that's for sure.’
    • ‘September is one of the busiest months of the year, with a range of different tasks at hand.’
    • ‘Counting back nine months on the calendar, my finger lands on the month of March.’
    • ‘The selection process and interviews will take place over this month and February.’
    • ‘I've got a very busy month of August coming up, and I would prefer to stay at home.’
    1. 1.1A period of time between the same dates in successive calendar months.
      ‘the president's rule was extended for six more months from March 3’
      • ‘Adeline Nakamura had met Bernard almost a year ago and they had been dating for a month.’
      • ‘This information must be sent to the address above within three months of the date of this letter.’
      • ‘If he is given the go ahead, it could be months before a date is set for the hearing.’
      • ‘He has had a long time to prepare the case and has known of the hearing date for months.’
      • ‘It lasts anywhere from a few minutes to a few hours and occurs over a period of weeks to months.’
      • ‘How this mood develops will depend hugely on whether the days and weeks spread to months and years.’
      • ‘Whether you hold them for weeks, months or years, shares are simply a means to a financial end.’
      • ‘Documents can be scanned and filed in seconds and made available a week, a month or a year later at the touch of a button.’
      • ‘Nurseries provide care for children aged from around six months up to five years old.’
      • ‘If you owe money for repair or valuation, the date must be at least three months from the day the notice is sent.’
      • ‘He jailed Khan for three years and nine months for riot, but added a further month for the breach of bail.’
      • ‘Stevens was jailed for three years and three months for the store raid last June.’
      • ‘The nursery will offer care for children from three months to five years at affordable prices.’
      • ‘The final deadline is no later than four months after the first day of the course.’
      • ‘The letter was posted on 8 September and arrived at a house in Nairobi one month later.’
    2. 1.2A period of 28 days or four weeks.
      ‘The operations are usually carried out three to four months into the pregnancies.’
      a long time, a lifetime, an eternity, seemingly forever

Phrases

    a month of Sundays
    informal
    • A very long period of time.

      ‘no one will find them in a month of Sundays’
      • ‘A council spokesman said: ‘You would never find this piece of land in a month of Sundays, so the parking must be being advertised somewhere, otherwise drivers would not know about it.’’
      • ‘If you had asked me at the top of Kilimanjaro whether I would want to do something like this again I would have said not in a month of Sundays.’
      • ‘It would take you a month of Sundays if you literally poke around with your trekking pole before you put a foot down, so you just trust that it's in the right place.’
      • ‘Political figures who view recent events as providing them with the best opportunity they have had in a month of Sundays to score points over republicans have been dominating the airways over the past 48 hours.’
      • ‘I think it would be nice to see another four and a half inch gun there but never in a month of Sundays will we see it happen.’
      • ‘LET'S be clear about one thing: I wouldn't vote for Dana in a month of Sundays, even if I had the opportunity.’
      • ‘They speak about negotiations for a month of Sundays.’
      • ‘It doesn't take long for people to change their shopping habits and go elsewhere where getting to the shops doesn't take a month of Sundays.’
      • ‘It is possible to learn to skydive in Britain, but with our weather it might take a month of Sundays to do it.’
      • ‘Wandering around a dusty ancestral home looking at furniture, paintings and ornaments that you'll never be able to afford in a month of Sundays was not my idea of a fun day out.’

Origin

Old English mōnath, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch maand and German Monat, also to moon.

Pronunciation

month

/mʌnθ/