Definition of muck in English:

muck

Pronunciation /mək/

Translate muck into Spanish

noun

  • 1Dirt, rubbish, or waste matter.

    ‘I'll just clean the muck off the windshield’
    • ‘I have lived like we did in the jungles, in dirt and filth and muck, unwashed and unkempt.’
    • ‘Apart from the litter have you also noticed the amount of muck and dirt on the roads this winter?’
    • ‘The bomb craters were so deep we couldn't walk down into them, so we struggled around their rims like ants, fighting for a purchase in dirt, muck and shattered roots.’
    • ‘‘Surely there must be a better way than having people wade through muck and dirt to these sites,’ he said.’
    • ‘This was an isolated incident, but residents were angry about the amount of muck, dirt and stones coming off each site on the lorries' wheels.’
    • ‘We're under the river - you realize - covered by metal, cement, rock, dirt, silt, muck, and water.’
    • ‘Then she screamed - the first scream of her adult life - as a slimy mixture of grease, muck and dirt poured out over her ankles.’
    • ‘It was full of green slime and muck instead of crystal clean water.’
    • ‘He says it's rather tacky, there are roadworks which haven't been fixed for days and the litter and muck just gets worse.’
    • ‘Not that there's much to see: what's at the bottom is not water, but muck and debris.’
    • ‘A muck of built-up sewage and slime sits at the bottom of the deep, slow-moving, polluted water.’
    • ‘The smog monster Hedora is an interesting creation, being made entirely out of sludge and muck.’
    • ‘It was muck, sludge, and sewage every day of the campaign.’
    • ‘Wells provided the villagers with clean drinking water, rather than the chocolate-coloured muck I had been swimming in.’
    • ‘He pointed out that an ordinary person leaving muck on a road would have to clean up the road afterwards.’
    • ‘The extraordinary attention to detail transports the viewer to Elizabethan London, from the grime and muck of the streets to the elegance of the palaces and nobility.’
    • ‘At Dillard, floodwaters receded to reveal muck, debris and tangled tree branches.’
    • ‘The floor was stone, but seemed to be hidden under a thin layer of muck, and debris from above.’
    • ‘I finished the gutters, sprayed some water up there to clean out the muck, and then surveyed the entire leaf-in-yard situation.’
    • ‘The muck and mire are long gone, and the golf course looks much the same as it did on opening day.’
    dirt, grime, filth, mud, slime, sludge, scum, mire, mess
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Farmyard manure, widely used as fertilizer.
      ‘he was covered in cow muck and mud’
      • ‘One of Britain's top trainers, Tim Easterby, who has 120 horses at Great Habton, Malton, uses the pure muck as a fertiliser on his own fields.’
      • ‘I assume the ‘very’ brown boots refers to farmyard muck?’
      • ‘‘As I started to turn round a guy tipped a bucket of farmyard muck over me and then threw the rest of it over me and the car,’ he said.’
      • ‘Farmers could earn substantial guaranteed income by utilising spare farm buildings to feed pigs - and use the muck to reduce fertiliser costs and boost cereal yields.’
      • ‘Under amendments to the Waste Management and Licensing Regulations, livery yards, stables and riding schools who add anything to their muck to compost it for fertiliser will be eligible for the fee.’
      • ‘He obviously missed the description of wading through cow muck to get to the feed-sheds in the dead of winter!’
      • ‘A Kendal farmer was landed with a £300 fine this week after putting wildlife at risk by polluting a stream with watery cow muck.’
      • ‘When the Victorians planted them the only problem was sheep muck and cow muck.’
      • ‘Then there's the problem on country roads of farmers leaving muck from their dung or slurry spreaders.’
      • ‘When she escaped, before I was covered in bird muck, I swear I saw a peregrine falcon fly down and cut her bonds.’
      • ‘We have some wonderful buildings in Trowbridge and they are just covered in bird muck.’
      • ‘A Darwen mother is refusing to let her daughter join a school ‘walking bus’ because she says the pavements are covered in dog muck.’
      • ‘But with fewer livestock now being kept, the steaming muck and straw is worth £20 a ton and farmers want to keep what they have got for their own land.’
      • ‘Farmers poured milk onto muck heaps yesterday at the beginning of a three-day protest at low food prices.’
      • ‘It stinks of horse muck at the moment and the rubbish is going everywhere.’
      • ‘They are left in all weathers for an unknown period in their own muck and urine.’
      • ‘Fly tipped garden rubbish is as much a stain on the countryside as dog muck and litter.’
      • ‘Thousands of fish died when pig muck which was ten times more concentrated than human sewage poured into the Farlington Beck.’
      • ‘On two occasions I have had a large amount of dog muck deposited on the pavement outside my house.’
      • ‘A gentleman took his child on to the new play area and complained about the amount of dog muck.’
      dung, manure, ordure, excrement, excreta, droppings, faeces, cowpats, guano, sewage
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2informal Something regarded as worthless, sordid, or corrupt.
      • ‘the muck that passes for music in the pop charts’
      • ‘First we read the menu: there's nowt but foreign muck,’
      • ‘He seems to have a genuine hatred for and problem with the muck so many kids get raised on, and recognises that this may be the only hot meal they get that day.’
      • ‘This news has almost forced me to once again swim into the muck of Democratic Underground, which I have not read in almost two weeks.’
      • ‘Besides, America is a country with widespread muck and mire, as you may have noticed from our presidential campaign.’
      • ‘My mammalian mind remains mired in the earthly muck of doubt.’
      • ‘Unlike real junk food, this rhetorical muck comes with no warnings about its worthless contents.’
      • ‘‘A lot of breweries were producing muck,’ Hal said.’
      • ‘The only problem was some bizarre muck - apparently pineapple and cucumber salsa - on the side of my plate, where it remained untroubled while the turbot disappeared at top speed.’
      • ‘And his daughters certainly don't deserve this sort of muck, regardless of what you might think of his policies and what his policies have done to other people's families.’

transitive verb

[with object]dialect British
  • Spread manure on (land)

    • ‘half the farm is mucked every year’

Phrases

    as common as muck
    British informal
    • Of low social status.

      • ‘He's as common as muck, and God help him if he has to perform state duties - he can't stand foreigners.’
      • ‘You know, Ramirez, sometimes you seem as common as muck, and other times you're the most princely person I've met.’
      • ‘She is posing as a lady but she is really as common as muck.’
      • ‘Sean Connery comes from the East of Scotland, with a 'posh' kinda tone, but we are from the West side and sound as common as muck.’
    make a muck of
    British informal
    • Handle incompetently.

      • ‘it's useless now that they've made a muck of it’
      • ‘Of course, if her side win today, Nilsmark will be remembered as the great master tactician, but if Europe slips to defeat, she could be accused of making a muck of her choices.’
      • ‘If Finnie makes a muck of it - as I'm sure he will - I wonder if Jack would look in my direction.’
      • ‘‘No, she's just made a muck of things, that's all.’’
      • ‘I think the reason we need all this legislation is that previous legislation made a muck of it, so we have the amendment bill to make sure that the law does not continue as it is.’
      • ‘I found letting my son look after his own money extremely hard as I was sure he would make a muck of it.’

Phrasal Verbs

    muck about
    British informal
    • 1Behave in a silly or aimless way, especially by wasting time when serious activity is expected.

      • ‘he spent his summers mucking about in boats’
      • ‘Plenty of people enjoy mucking about in boats, but just as many appreciate a power shower and a lie-down in a real bed afterwards.’
      • ‘I didn't know what to expect, but they were laughing and mucking about.’
      • ‘He does all the serious stuff, which allows me to muck about.’
      • ‘Which is ace, as it's relaxing watching the foxes skulk around in the evening - and last summer, the fox cubs mucking about.’
      • ‘In 1975, he retired to the shores of Loch Fyne, where he indulged his love of renovating and mucking about in boats.’
    • 2muck about with somethingTinker with something, typically so as to damage or spoil it.

      • ‘have you been mucking about with the thermostat?’
    • 3muck someone about, muck about someoneTreat someone inconsiderately, typically by disrupting their plans.

      • ‘what the management has to learn is that we can't be mucked about’
    muck up
    informal
    • 1muck something up, muck up somethingDo something badly or ineptly; mishandle something.

      • ‘she had mucked up her first few weeks at college’
    • 2Australian, New Zealand Behave badly; mess around.

      • ‘boys are more likely to muck up at what they see as poor teaching’
    muck out
    British
    • also muck something out, muck out somethingRemove manure and other dirt from a stable or other building where animals are kept.

      ‘she had spent that morning mucking out the stables’
      • ‘we let the horses walk around the yard while we muck out’
    muck in
    British informal
    • Share tasks or facilities with other people on an equal basis.

      • ‘in a small business, everyone has to muck in’
      • ‘the managing director will be mucking in with 200 volunteers’

Origin

Middle English muk, probably of Scandinavian origin: compare with Old Norse myki ‘dung’, from a Germanic base meaning ‘soft’, shared by meek.