Main definitions of nap in English

: nap1nap2nap3nap4

nap1

verbnaps, napping, napped

[no object]
  • Sleep lightly or briefly, especially during the day.

    ‘she took to napping on the beach in the afternoons’
    • ‘I wondered if I had been glued to the bed, I could barely will myself to move, and then finally able to lift a limb or two, I turned over and felt into a sound sleep, napping for an hour.’
    • ‘I have no idea what I'm thinking or feeling about this, but I must be nervous, since I was up all night, and just napped very briefly today.’
    • ‘For many months he wouldn't settle, slept fitfully, never napped and as a result was tired, irritable and tiring.’
    • ‘All this activity did wonders for their sleeping habits; they napped easily and slept through the night the entire week.’
    • ‘The younger participants also reported slightly more time napping but slightly poorer sleep quality than the older participants.’
    • ‘They take behavioral steps to compensate for the sleep loss, napping during the day or early evening.’
    • ‘His defence were napping once more and Shaun Varley was unchallenged as he guided in a header.’
    • ‘Mack was napping on the couch when Jack and Sam came into the living room.’
    • ‘Rachel is napping on her couch in the middle of her run-down apartment.’
    • ‘I was very close to napping on the couch until he was done running around.’
    • ‘I soon found an unconscious Charlie napping quite peacefully near a dimly lit grove.’
    • ‘Tom was yawning sleepily, and Lily was already napping peacefully on his skinny shoulder.’
    • ‘Kristen groaned loudly, wishing for a quiet time to nap peacefully.’
    • ‘Why is it I sleep so much better napping during the day than I do at night?’
    • ‘I figured that I could always nap in the early afternoon through West Virginia and Maryland.’
    • ‘Sure, I think, I would be tired, but I could nap in the afternoon.’
    • ‘They would nap sometimes in the afternoon, but between lunch and dinner his brother always disappeared.’
    • ‘Following lunch, he would nap for an hour.’
    • ‘Her eyes were closed; she was probably napping again.’
    • ‘Make sure you relax enough but avoid cat napping.’
    doze, sleep, sleep lightly, take a nap, catnap, rest, take a siesta, drowse
    View synonyms

noun

  • A short sleep, especially during the day.

    ‘excuse me, I'll just take a little nap’
    • ‘And then we all had a nice long afternoon nap.’
    • ‘He took a short nap in the afternoon and that was all.’
    • ‘I'll just take a nice long nap and you can wake me up in 2 hours.’
    • ‘I felt a little weary when I'd eaten, and had a short afternoon nap to rest up.’
    • ‘I hope you've had a nice little nap, because I haven't slept in 24 hours.’
    • ‘Maybe a short little nap will help me think of what to say.’
    • ‘The second study showed that a 30-minute midday nap can reverse information overload.’
    • ‘If a 5-year-old gets adequate rest at night, he or she no longer needs a daytime nap.’
    • ‘He manages to sneak in a 2-hour nap before dinner.’
    • ‘Surely my 30 min power nap during the day shouldn't have given me that effect?’
    • ‘He doubted anyone would mind if he caught a brief nap before they set off this afternoon.’
    • ‘I think a mid evening power nap is the way forward.’
    • ‘By the age of four, most children no longer require a daytime nap.’
    • ‘When I woke up from my nap on the couch it was dark outside.’
    • ‘The urge for a midday nap is built into your body's biological clock.’
    • ‘Some people call two hours of sleep a midday nap; I call it an accomplishment.’
    • ‘Stop being such a party animal, and try taking a little cat nap.’
    • ‘There was even an unofficial press tradition of a nap after lunch, when nothing much tended to happen.’
    • ‘Well, it had been a busy afternoon, and I'd missed out on my nap after lunch.’
    • ‘I groaned and rolled over as some obnoxious buzzing noise interrupted my nap.’
    • ‘My nap was interrupted at about six that evening by a knock on my bedroom door.’
    sleep, light sleep, catnap, siesta, doze, lie-down, rest
    View synonyms

Phrases

    catch someone napping
    British informal
    • Find someone off guard and unprepared to respond.

      ‘the goalkeeper was caught napping by a shot from Carpenter’
      • ‘Several times throughout the first half, they were caught napping as the ball was played over, through and round them.’
      • ‘From the restart, Windermere were caught napping, however, when poor tackling let Workington drive up the centre of the park.’
      • ‘Eventually, Manchester took a 2-1 lead before half time with an opportunist goal when a quickly-take free hit just inside the 22 caught Kendal napping for a second time.’
      • ‘Look, the administration said months ago that we were caught napping in this area.’
      • ‘I mean, you open the newspaper today and meningitis is across it many times and so we have been caught napping in terms of being arrogant enough to think that we've conquered infectious disease.’
      • ‘Indeed, the inclusion of these fine players in the opposition ranks strengthened the Colne side and it was they who nearly opened the scoring as Ilkley were caught napping.’
      • ‘Then 11 minutes from time City were caught napping again.’
      • ‘The burghers of the town had been caught napping during the committee stages of the Bill.’
      • ‘With Celtic pushing forward for the equaliser they were caught napping three minutes from time, to give the visitors a some what fortunate win.’
      • ‘He said: ‘I was caught napping that morning, the top three competitors stole a huge advantage over me which prevented me from challenging for a top three position.’’

Origin

Old English hnappian, probably of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

nap

/nap/

Main definitions of nap in English

: nap1nap2nap3nap4

nap2

noun

  • 1in singular The raised hairs or threads on the surface of fabric or suede leather, in terms of the direction in which they naturally lie.

    ‘carefully machine the seam, following the direction of the nap’
    • ‘Flannelette is a soft cotton fabric with a nap on one side.’
    • ‘Stitch all seams in the direction of the nap with right sides together.’
    • ‘Flannel wool is a soft, lightweight fabric with a nap on one or both sides.’
    • ‘You can use it for fabric with a nap too - just put an arrow on it.’
    • ‘When woollen cloth was woven on a handloom the nap had to be combed in order to raise it.’
    • ‘Even the red velvet cushions on each chair look untouched, brushed by the servants so that the nap is all in the same direction.’
    • ‘It might have also had its nap raised by the use of teasels over the surface of the fabric.’
    • ‘Brushing the nap against the grain on the pieces that were hung the wrong way will sometimes provide a more uniform look.’
    • ‘The fabric will smooth down if you are going with the nap (like stroking a cat).’
    • ‘With these pressing aids, the velvet is placed face down on the board and the raised surface of the board prevents crushing the nap.’
    • ‘If the carpet is a dark color, a light sweeping sends the little grains into the nap, where they disappear from view.’
    • ‘For wear purposes, would it be best to have the grain nap go across the chair back and cushion, or from back to front, or front to back?’
    • ‘His bare feet stepped on the thick nap of the plush carpet underfoot.’
    • ‘Adapting this technique to fleece involves taking advantage of the fabric's loft and nap to simplify the process.’
    • ‘Railroading means that the pattern or nap on the fabric goes from side to side of the roll rather than up the roll.’
    • ‘Brush blanket on both sides with stiff brush to raise nap, press binding, using synthetic setting on iron.’
    pile, fibres, threads, weave, shag, texture, feel, surface, grain
    View synonyms
  • 2Australian informal, dated A bedroll used for sleeping on in the open.

Origin

Late Middle English noppe, from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German noppe ‘nap’, noppen ‘trim the nap from’. nap (sense 2 of the noun) is probably from knapsack.

Pronunciation

nap

/nap/

Main definitions of nap in English

: nap1nap2nap3nap4

nap3

noun

  • 1mass noun A card game resembling whist in which players declare the number of tricks they expect to take, up to five.

  • 2British A tipster's prediction of the probable winner of a race.

    ‘he discovered that his nap of the day had sprinted home at 10–1 at Doncaster’
    • ‘The three-year-old bids for the £10,000 Tote Quick Pick Showcase Handicap and carries the nap to get his head in front.’
    • ‘A top-class colt last season, Azamour has all the credentials required to win this crackerjack of a race and he is awarded the nap vote.’
    • ‘Whispered Promises gets the nap vote over an extended seven furlongs.’
    • ‘At Ludlow, Maybeseven is awarded the nap vote in the Sara Hamilton-Russell Memorial Handicap Hurdle over three-and-a-quarter miles.’
    • ‘Konker, who is sure to improve for the outing, is at his best on the level over today's trip of a mile and a quarter and he is made the nap selection to follow up his win in the same race 12 months ago.’
    • ‘Lothersdale ‘C’ went double nap at home to Ilkley Road ‘B’ to leave them just one point behind Nemesis.’
    • ‘The Cleveland trainer saddles nap selection Robbo, who makes plenty of appeal as a 14-1 shot following his recent victory at Kelso.’

verbnaps, napping, napped

[with object]British
  • Name (a horse or greyhound) as a probable winner of a race.

    ‘Harbinger is napped to win the Novices' Hurdle’
    • ‘Motivator was napped by three of our pundits when a panel of experts were asked for their Derby 1-2 - 3s.’

Phrases

    go nap
    • 1Attempt to take all five tricks in nap.

      1. 1.1Score or win five times.
        ‘Tranmere Rovers went nap to inflict a heavy 5–1 defeat on West Ham’
        • ‘Chamionship-chasing Nestlé Rowntree went nap against fierce cross-city rivals York RI at New Lane to keep up the pressure on West Yorkshire League leaders Carlton Athletic.’
        • ‘Kirkdale United went nap to take over leadership of the first division of the RJF Homes-Beckett League.’
        • ‘His shot took a nasty deflection to beat the keeper as the Shrimps went nap with moments to go.’
        • ‘But with Potter beaten again, Morecambe were prevented from going nap by a post.’
        • ‘As the teams lined up for the second-half, BJFF had a mean hungry look about them and it wasn't long before they went nap.’
        • ‘Black Dog Camblesforth were another side who went nap as they had a nine-goal shut-out against Yearsley Grove.’
        • ‘A 15-minute spell had seen Barnet score four times and they made it five in the last seconds making sure the Bees went nap to leave Morecambe in a state of shock.’
        • ‘Nestle Rowntree went nap as they won an eight-goal thriller away to Armley Athletic in the West Yorkshire League premier division - despite being a man down.’
      2. 1.2Risk everything in one attempt.

Origin

Early 19th century abbreviation of napoleon, the original name of the card game.

Pronunciation

nap

/nap/

Main definitions of nap in English

: nap1nap2nap3nap4

nap4

verbnaps, napping, napped

[no object]
  • (of a horse) refuse, especially habitually, to go on at the rider's instruction; jib.

    ‘horses which nap should be dealt with by professionals’
    • ‘Vices, if they occur, like napping, can quickly be overcome, with no fear of getting the bit pulled through the mouth.’
    • ‘She will be showing people how to deal with issues like jumping, biting, rearing and napping by ‘listening’ to their horse.’
    • ‘At the first fence, he naps and runs out, and I hit him, and he bucked me off and was running around this field with me and the owners chasing after him.’

Origin

1950s back-formation from nappy, an adjective first used to describe heady beer (late Middle English), later used in the sense ‘intoxicated by drink’ (early 18th century), and since the 1920s used to describe a disobedient horse.

Pronunciation

nap

/nap/