Main definitions of nappy in English

: nappy1nappy2

nappy1

Pronunciation /ˈnapē/ /ˈnæpi/

See synonyms for nappy

Translate nappy into Spanish

nounnappies

British
  • A piece of absorbent material wrapped around a baby's bottom and between its legs to absorb and retain urine and feces; a diaper.

    ‘he is busy making bottles and changing dirty nappies’
    • ‘disposable nappies’
    • ‘You will have huge embarrassment value in later life showing your daughter's first boyfriend her as a baby with no nappy!’
    • ‘Here you'll find such a nappy alarm which involves clamping a sensor onto the baby's nappy.’
    • ‘He was attacked after the class nanny stepped out of the room to change another baby's nappy.’
    • ‘In the West, however, babies wear nappies or diapers until they learn to use a pot.’
    • ‘The ammonia produced by stale urine can make the skin under and around a baby's nappy very sore and red, with red spots, blisters and broken skin.’
    • ‘Having read all the right books about childhood development, the Professor displayed not the slightest dismay as he quietly drained the tub and got the little chap into a nice, fresh nappy.’
    • ‘One witness was changing his child's nappy shortly before midnight when he looked up through a skylight and saw a huge fireball in the sky.’
    • ‘Consider the cost of 36 nappy changes a day, 24 feeds, five tubs of baby formula and four and a half boxes of rusks per week.’
    • ‘Also for hygiene and ventilation reasons we have nappy changing area in the toilets.’
    • ‘One of the big things is getting out and showing people their image of a traditional, old-fashioned nappy is wrong - there are lots of choices.’
    • ‘A bigger pack of 54 was on sale for £8.96, or 16.6p per nappy.’
    • ‘Annual sales of three billion disposables makes the UK market worth an estimated £1.2 billion, on the basis of a retail price of 40p per nappy.’
    • ‘Feminists are also on his case, reminding him about all those glowing family photographs and public eulogies to nappy-changing.’
    • ‘All you ever wear is a kukoi, a sort of gown-up's nappy.’
    • ‘Legal proceedings are being taken against an airline which threw a man off a plane for allegedly pushing a hostess after changing his daughter's nappy.’
    • ‘How can one 2.5 year old create so much mess in one nappy?’
    • ‘At this moment, there was a mighty smell accompanied by an appropriate noise from Ben's nappy.’
    • ‘Find spare nappy, shorts and a carrier bag to put wet clothes in.’
    • ‘Unless I'm mistaken, and a ‘fund manager’ is actually some kind of teddy bear or brand of nappy, junior, I think, will live through the day without one.’
    • ‘It was when changing my daughter's nappy (Oh yes, I'm a modern man) that I suddenly realised the best way to get good service in a restaurant.’

Origin

1920s abbreviation of napkin.

Main definitions of nappy in English

: nappy1nappy2

nappy2

Pronunciation /ˈnapē/ /ˈnæpi/

See synonyms for nappy

Translate nappy into Spanish

adjectivenappier, nappiest

informal US
  • (of hair) frizzy (typically used with reference to black people)

    • ‘I became proud of my thick, nappy hair’
    • ‘‘She just wanted to know what nappy hair felt like,’ my mom complained all the way home.’
    • ‘These were the dark-skinned folk with nappy hair.’
    • ‘Well, let me take my nappy hair and get out of here.’
    • ‘I think I look fine even though I am over weight, have nappy hair, and seem a bit grouchy, as you would if you were a freak having to put up with normal people.’
    • ‘Look at grandma - she's got nappy hair, big lips, a wide nose, high cheek bones.’
    • ‘There were no sequined costumes or crèmed down nappy hair for the performers here.’
    • ‘He got up and sighed, sweeping his hand through his nappy grey brown hair, his usual habit.’
    • ‘I decided that no matter how much I try to manipulate my hair to be bone straight or wet and curly, the truth of the matter is my hair is nappy.’

Origin

Late 15th century (in the sense ‘shaggy’): from Middle Dutch noppigh, Middle Low German noppich, from noppe (see nap). The current sense dates from the early 20th century.