Definition of newsjacking in English:

newsjacking

noun

mass nounMarketing
  • The practice of taking advantage of current events or news stories in such a way as to promote or advertise one's product or brand.

    ‘timing is everything when it comes to newsjacking’
    • ‘They used newsjacking , rather than paid media, to slingshot content and drive discoverability.’
    • ‘When you do newsjacking poorly, it can come off as tasteless, crass or just plain offensive.’
    • ‘Incorporating newsjacking in a genuine and legitimate manner will help encourage your news to be seen.’
    • ‘ Newsjacking is a game of speed, so you should constantly be checking news sites and social media networks.’
    • ‘My hope is to speak with Scott again so that we can have a more in-depth discussion about newsjacking.’
    • ‘While I believe newsjacking is an interesting way to gain viral exposure, I also think that it could be pretty risky when not well done.’
    • ‘I make use of newsjacking all the time.’
    • ‘This algorithm update has created an easy way for brands to boost their Facebook engagement via newsjacking.’
    • ‘ Newsjacking isn't a tactic that every company should use.’
    • ‘The concept of newsjacking is not new to marketing.’
    • ‘The key to successful newsjacking is preparation.’

Origin

1970s (with reference to the theft of newspapers in order to sell them to scrap dealers): blend of news and hijacking; the modern use dates from the early 21st century.

Pronunciation

newsjacking

/ˈnjuːzdʒakɪŋ/