Definition of newt in English:

newt

noun

  • A small slender-bodied amphibian with lungs and a well-developed tail, typically spending its adult life on land and returning to water to breed.

    Triturus and other genera, family Salamandridae: numerous species

    • ‘Around 5,000 amphibian species, including frogs, toads, newts, and salamanders are thought to exist today.’
    • ‘A study by Conservation International, an American organisation, found that nearly a third of frogs, toads, newts and other amphibian species were likely to disappear within 100 years.’
    • ‘Some amphibians we know today include frogs, toads, newts and salamanders.’
    • ‘Creating log piles may help to attract hedgehogs, and rockeries may attract frogs, newts and toads who usually spend winter on land.’
    • ‘Viable woodlands are just as critical as clean waters for frogs, toads, turtles, salamanders, newts, and many species of reptiles.’
    • ‘Forty-four adult male and 11 adult female red-spotted newts were collected from a private pond in Chenango County, New York, in late May 2000.’
    • ‘Among vertebrates, newts and other urodele amphibians show a remarkable capacity for regeneration.’
    • ‘Truly cold-blooded animals like lizards, newts, turtles, and crocodilians, which are superabundant farther south are missing, he said.’
    • ‘Rare species include the Pacific pond turtle, the California red-legged frog, the California newt, and the California tree frog.’
    • ‘But some populations of garter snakes eat the newt willingly.’
    • ‘Water provides a breeding place for frogs, toads, newts and dragonflies.’
    • ‘A pond is a little world in itself, he says, home to a dizzying array of creatures from frogs and newts to water boatmen, diving beetles, dragonflies and damselflies.’
    • ‘Their steep slopes are the nearest thing to a rainforest in Europe, overflowing with springs and pools which are home to salamanders and newts.’
    • ‘There are seven categories of fish, including the basking shark, and the same number of amphibians and reptiles such as turtles, toads, lizards and newts.’
    • ‘After initially seizing and beginning to swallow a newt, many snakes subsequently release the newt after as much as one hour of holding the prey item in the mouth and upper digestive tract.’
    • ‘The tail sweep of a tuna, a newt, a crocodile, or a whale is the leverage act of the backbone pushing water with the expanded tail.’
    • ‘The park was transformed from wasteland in 1997 and is home to a fascinating array of wildlife including frogs, toads, newts, dragonflies, damselflies, butterflies and birds.’
    • ‘There are newts, toads, frogs and fish - all of which birds feed on.’
    • ‘The sudden arrival of warm wet weather caused a mass night-time migration of frogs, newts and toads to deluge the centre in Barnes.’
    • ‘The ‘true salamanders’ tend to be smooth skinned, while the newts are unlike all other salamanders in having rough skin that is not slimy.’

Origin

Late Middle English from an ewt (ewt from Old English efeta see eft), interpreted (by wrong division) as a newt.

Pronunciation

newt

/njuːt/