Definition of offside in English:

offside

Translate offside into Spanish

adverb

  • 1(especially in soccer or hockey) in a position where playing the ball or puck is not allowed, especially (in soccer) in the attacking half ahead of the ball and having fewer than two defenders nearer the goal line at the moment the ball is played.

    ‘the attacker looked offside by several yards’
    • ‘his radicalism caught him offside with the law’
    • ‘They managed it by surviving the first scrum and forcing their opponents offside, allowing O'Gara to kick them ahead from short range.’
    • ‘As coach, he dragged players who ignored his leads, even if they were kicking goals, and put many players offside.’
    • ‘I thought both times they had players offside and the officials felt the same.’
    • ‘Both teams were guilty of playing the game at least a couple of yards offside and handling the ball on the floor at almost every breakdown.’
    • ‘Not surprisingly, Drogheda continued in confident mood in the second half, when a well organised defence constantly caught the home players offside.’
    • ‘Italy get a free-kick wide on the left, from which De Rossi deliberately stands five yards offside.’
    • ‘Unfortunately for the home side both Howey and Dunne, and a least two others, were yards offside.’
    • ‘Coe sneaking back from an offside position was allowed to play the ball and lob it over Bainbridge into the goal.’
    • ‘Then referee Presley deemed Smith offside a yard from his own corner with the ball heading the other way - a decision which was harsh at best.’
    • ‘Canham looked at least a couple of yards offside as he collected the ball on the edge of the Morecambe penalty area.’
    • ‘His long-range shot flew in off a post but the linesman saw a player standing in an offside position.’
    • ‘In the opening game, Diouf was a magnificent player who seemed unfortunate to get caught offside a lot.’
    • ‘The visitors clearly felt that the Trojans' player was in an offside position and they continued their protests long after the final whistle.’
    • ‘Running on to it with only Carroll to beat, Gimenez is penalised for being offside.’
    • ‘Manager's and supporter's say nothing when their team score's an offside goal or a dodgy penalty and when one of their player's get away with cheating they never see it.’
    • ‘I could see that Ashley Cole was trying to get back so I knew I wasn't offside and suddenly I had one of those shots where you just get your head down and hit it.’
    • ‘Great footie players are deft at faking their way offsides without getting caught.’
    • ‘After 34 minutes Selby were caught offside in front of the posts.’
    • ‘Robinson added the extra two and a further penalty when the visitors strayed offside.’
    • ‘A fraction later the ball is headed down for Owen, but he's flagged offside.’
    1. 1.1usually offsidesAmerican Football Over the scrimmage line or otherwise ahead of the ball before the play has begun.

Pronunciation

offside

/ˌôfˈsīd/ /ˌɔfˈsaɪd/

adjective

  • 1(especially in soccer or hockey) occupying or taking place in a position where playing the ball or puck is not allowed, especially (in soccer) in the attacking half ahead of the ball and having fewer than two defenders nearer the goal line at the moment the ball is played.

    • ‘he was beaten by an offside goal’
    1. 1.1usually offsidesAmerican Football Occupying a position over the scrimmage line or otherwise ahead of the ball before the play has begun.

Pronunciation

offside

/ˌôfˈsīd/ /ˌɔfˈsaɪd/

noun

  • 1The fact of being offside in soccer and other sports.

    ‘the goal was disallowed for offside’
    • ‘the linesman had spotted an offside’
  • 2usually the off sideBritish The side of a vehicle furthest from the curb (in Britain, the right)

    Compare with nearside

    • ‘the rear offside wheel’
    1. 2.1The right side of a horse.

Pronunciation

offside

/ˌôfˈsīd/ /ˌɔfˈsaɪd/