Definition of Ojibwa in English:

Ojibwa

nounplural noun Ojibwa, plural noun Ojibwas, plural noun Ojibways

(also Ojibway)
  • 1A member of a North American people of the region around Lake Superior.

    Also called Chippewa

    ‘The Ojibwas had likewise used deception to their benefit in taking Michilimackinac.’
    • ‘The two Ojibwas affectionately nicknamed him ‘Baptiste’ or ‘Bateese’ for reasons never clear to him.’
    • ‘But long, long before the Voyageurs came the forests were home to the Sioux and the Ojibwa.’
    • ‘The Agawa rock paintings are among the best preserved of about 400 groups of pictographs on the Canadian Shield and are attributed to Algonquins such as the Ojibwa.’
    • ‘Such an equivocating philosophy might not pass muster with the Ojibwa.’
    • ‘It was characteristic of Bill to remember my key point in a paper I gave there on my fieldwork among the Ojibwa.’
    • ‘The French generally enjoyed good relations with nations such as the Ojibwa and the Potawatomi so long as trade goods were readily available and reasonably priced.’
    • ‘These traits relate them to the southern Ojibwa or Chippewa.’
    • ‘Among the Ojibwa, however, there is some evidence that children sometimes modeled animals in clay.’
    • ‘The children also study the lives of the Ojibwa, the native people who not only thrived in this difficult land but preserved it for future generations.’
    • ‘We found haplogroup X when we were studying the Ojibwa of the Great Lakes.’
    • ‘The Ojibwa called the grain manomin or mahnomen (after the Menominee tribe) meaning good berry.’
    • ‘This condition was reported among the Northern Algonkian language group of Indians (Chippewa, Ojibwa, and Cree) living around the Great Lakes of Canada and the United States.’
    • ‘The Cree and Ojibwa were the tribal groups most studied, accounting for 37 of papers.’
    • ‘Traditional enemies and trade rivals were the Cree and Ojibwa to the north and east.’
    • ‘By 1875 the Saulteaux, Cree and Ojibwa of Manitoba had generations of experience interacting with Europeans in connection with the fur trade.’
    • ‘Like the allotment system, relocation focused on individual Ojibwa rather than tribal group and Native culture.’
    • ‘One of the most forceful Aboriginal protests aimed against the removal policy was articulated by one of Jones's fellow Ojibwa.’
    • ‘The most detailed ethnographic work on the Saulteaux is by Hallowell, who called them Northern Ojibwa.’
  • 2The Algonquian language of the Ojibwa.

    ‘There are two sources of native borrowing: the Canadian Indian languages such as Cree, Dene, and Ojibwa, and Inuktitut, the language of the Inuit.’
    • ‘In this specific way the historical development of Miami-Illinois resembles that of Fox, one of its closest sister languages, rather than that of Ojibwa, another of its closest sister languages.’

Pronunciation

Ojibwa

/ōˈjibˌwā/ /-wə/ /oʊˈɪbwɑː/

adjective

(also Ojibway)
  • Relating to the Ojibwa or their language.

    ‘Similarly, the Native Americans of the Chippewa / Ojibwa tribes thought that the Sun's flames were being extinguished, and so during an eclipse they would launch skywards burning arrows in order to replenish it.’
    • ‘After 1840 many Metis buffalo hunters, the offspring of European fur traders and Cree and Ojibwa women, also joined these groups.’
    • ‘The portability of Ojibwa lodging - the wigwam - enabled such moves to be made quickly and easily.’
    • ‘Although their origins are found in more easterly Ojibwa populations in northwestern Ontario, the Saulteaux displaced the Cree around Lake Winnipeg by the beginning of the nineteenth century.’
    • ‘In 1962, in Minnesota's Stillwater State Prison, two Ojibwa inmates organized 46 Indian prisoners into a group to study Indian issues.’
    • ‘She uses a number of Ojibwa terms in her narrative and provides a glossary, which allows readers to participate in an aspect of Ojibwa culture that might have been alienating otherwise.’
    • ‘Morrison was born on the Grand Portage Ojibwa Reservation in northern Minnesota in 1919.’
    • ‘In this series of three linked stories, a modern-day Ojibwa grandfather, Noshen, and his grandson, Mishomis, venture out early one morning in the grandfather's birch bark canoe.’
    • ‘To Murie's joy, the leader assigned him to paddle with one of the Ojibwa guides, Joseph Odjik, thus making him in his words, ‘the sixth Indian.’’
    • ‘Simon still wears his hair long to honor the tradition of his Ojibwa tribe.’
    • ‘A typical Ojibwa sentence contains a multipart verb, the core meaning of which is carried by a verb stem, itself composed of meaningful elements.’
    • ‘His paintings and prints go well beyond storytelling and represent many of the sacred figures of the Ojibwa people.’
    • ‘The owner, Shamengwa, is an older, respected musician who lives on an Ojibwa reservation.’
    • ‘About 5,000 people live on the reservation, almost all of them Indians of the Ojibwa tribe, commonly called Chippewa.’
    • ‘Shania's dad leaves the family when she is two, her mother remarrying Jerry Twain, an Ojibwa Indian.’
    • ‘If a story written by an Ojibwa author does not deal with topics indigenous to his or her people but instead tells of a more universal conflict, would we still categorize that book as ‘Native American’?’
    • ‘The girls continued their work and giggled among themselves as they continued their work and conversed in the Ojibwa tongue.’
    • ‘Clifford lacked Algonquin or Ojibwa bloodlines, so he felt relatively safe.’
    • ‘Don't think about being Lakota, or about us being Ojibwa, or about those that might not accept you.’
    • ‘My heritage has enough Ojibwa and Cree blood to hold legitimate membership in ‘Metis Nation of Alberta.’’

Pronunciation

Ojibwa

/ōˈjibˌwā/ /-wə/ /oʊˈɪbwɑː/

Origin

From Ojibwa ojibwe, said to mean ‘puckered’, with reference to their moccasins.