Definition of one-off in English:

one-off

Pronunciation /ˈwən ˈˌɔf/

Translate one-off into Spanish

adjective

mainly British
  • Done, made, or happening only once and not repeated.

    ‘one-off tax deductible donations to charity’
    • ‘If what happened in Wales were to happen in England, then, whatever Labour may say now, 7 million homes in England would face big one-off jumps in council tax.’
    • ‘The department said it was still too early to say if the improvement in the public finances would continue as some of the increase in tax revenues were from one-off items.’
    • ‘Qantas made A $256 million after tax and before one-off items in the six months to December 31.’
    • ‘However, both re-mortgaging and trading down are largely one-off benefits and unlikely to be repeated.’
    • ‘You can make one-off donations or regular transfers to a charity by direct debit or standing order.’
    • ‘The single issue, one-off parish poll was conducted 14 months ago, but ever since then a question mark has hung over whether or not the result is enforceable.’
    • ‘Moreover, large, one-off payments for single books do not immediately conjure up the image of an ongoing, committed publishing relationship.’
    • ‘As an Old Firm manager O'Neill is entitled to feel bemused at how two years of good work can be distilled down to the black and white of how his team perform in a single, one-off match.’
    • ‘The machines, which may be extended to other Park & Ride sites in the future, will not be able to deal with one-off single or return tickets.’
    • ‘I think this is really, in a way, a strange and one-off situation.’
    • ‘The holiday-homes market also performed well, especially one-off new-builds.’
    • ‘It is also a rare and one-off opportunity, and it is one we have to get right.’
    • ‘Supporters of the club have been invited to make either weekly contributions to the fund over a 40-week period or one-off donations.’
    • ‘It is time to stop buying one-off single bottles.’
    • ‘First of all, distinguish between one-off consumption, such as at a party, and habitual alcohol intake, as measured over an average week.’
    • ‘It will replace the existing one-off tax on income.’
    • ‘More traditional players would tend to consider single debtors and one-off transactions unsuitable for invoice discounting.’
    • ‘To start a system of registering all bicycles would be almost impossible, but a one-off tax at point-of-sale for new bicycles would be the easiest answer.’
    • ‘The usual pattern was the one-off benefit to private capital of a state asset on the cheap - with debts being expunged and subsidies being provided.’
    • ‘Apart from a one-off benefit show in 1987, this will be the first show anywhere by The Radiators in 24 years.’
    distinctive, individual, special, especial, idiosyncratic, quirky, eccentric, isolated

noun

mainly British
  • 1Something done, made, or happening only once, not as part of a regular sequence.

    ‘the meeting is a one-off’
    • ‘I feel hustle and bustle may be enough to inflict damage in the group stage but once the games become one-offs and we have to go the extra mile to carve out victories I feel we will be once again found lacking.’
    • ‘It's a cup game and they are always one-offs so anything could happen.’
    • ‘Hopefully it is not a one-off because it happens to be World Environment Day.’
    • ‘It turns out that this isn't a one-off, but happens every Friday in the summer.’
    • ‘It is not just a one-off that happens with the liquidators.’
    • ‘I tried to convince myself it was just a one-off until it happened again.’
    • ‘The Ascot authorities insist it was a one-off, a special extension of Flat Racing's showpiece to celebrate the Queen's Jubilee.’
    • ‘‘This is a one-off for a special occasion and it's nice to have done it,’ said Mr Yates.’
    • ‘Paul is treating the meeting as a one-off at present.’
    • ‘Four photographs by Bert Stern, which have been exhibited only once in Japan, are untouched one-offs which show her crow's feet and facial hair.’
    • ‘Some specialize in trading witty one-offs; others prefer thoughtful, meandering conversations.’
    • ‘However, these are one-offs involving special constraints requiring the most sophisticated equipment and represent very much upper cost limits.’
    • ‘Special non-trading one-offs rightly get taken out to reflect underlying performance.’
    • ‘This time last year, Palm recognised earnings of $15.8 million (three cents a share) before one-offs and $11.0 million once they were taken into account.’
    • ‘On Monday, the company said it would make a profit - bar one-offs and special items.’
    • ‘What happened with my brother wasn't a one-off.’
    • ‘The final is different, a one-off, and anything can happen.’
    • ‘It was unfortunate what happened and I am sure it was a one-off.’
    • ‘But Prof Edwards believes that whatever happens in the Beagle 2 project it is not a one-off.’
    • ‘I paid compensation and it was a blot on my character, but it was a one-off.’
    individualist, free spirit, nonconformist, original, eccentric, character, bohemian, maverick, rare bird, rarity
    1. 1.1A person who is unusual or unique, especially in an admirable way.
      ‘he's a one-off, no one else has his skills’
      • ‘The first thing to say about Rice is that he is a one-off, a unique talent, and he does things his way.’
      • ‘I can't understand that mindset, but I also wonder if Jonny is simply a one-off.’
      • ‘‘No-one should think Roy is a one-off in wanting to speak his mind and stand up,’ the Celtic manager pointed out.’
      • ‘Even amongst the company he kept, Gary was a one-off.’
      • ‘I wouldn't say this about many celebrities but this Charlotte is a genuine one-off.’
      • ‘Luke Flanagan aka Ming the Merciless is a one-off: eccentric and radical but with a winning, lively and likeable personality.’
      • ‘Sonny, of Bolton Woods, was a one-off, an irreplaceable character known both in and out of the horse fraternity.’
      • ‘Higgins is a one-off, a character, and he made the modern game what it is.’
      • ‘Paul was such a loveable character - a one-off who loved working with and riding horses.’
      • ‘That's the sort of hunger that marks out great champions from the names you barely remember, the one-offs, fine players at the time and whose achievement merits respect, but not quite the stuff of legends.’
      • ‘Joyti and Jeffrey are presented as one-offs, bad apples of which Goldman Sachs and the BBC were the unlucky victims.’
      • ‘Carrey, a lifelong Kaufman fan himself, manages to convey a real magic and the film is a loving tribute to one of the entertainment industry's true one-offs.’
      • ‘Malcolm was a complete one-off; a big, bumbling man, who wore dirty, ill-fitting suits and smelt of fags, but was absolutely hilarious when on stage.’
      collector's item, rare person, rare thing, rare bird, marvel, wonder, nonpareil, one of a kind, find, conversation piece