Definition of opportunist in English:

opportunist

noun

  • A person who takes advantage of opportunities as and when they arise, regardless of planning or principle.

    ‘most burglaries are committed by casual opportunists’
    • ‘We've got our whole country giving, and you yet you see people out here who are clearly opportunists taking advantage of a sad situation.’
    • ‘As we noted here, opportunists will always arise to exploit an exploitable situation.’
    • ‘Contrary to popular opinion, these crimes are not committed by opportunists who see an expensive car and take a chance.’
    • ‘It said criminals are more likely to be opportunists making the most of chances that arise in their everyday lives.’
    • ‘The fact that there are opportunists in the world does not change anything regarding the need to protect people.’
    • ‘I've seen people react to the opportunists with even more idiocy.’
    • ‘Close scrutiny revealed that some opportunists had collected the used bottles and filled them with ordinary water to sell them at premium rates.’
    • ‘This is how the opportunists must be taught a lesson.’
    • ‘Not necessarily incompetent, they are opportunists who seize the chance to make lots of money for doing relatively little work.’
    • ‘Some of their accusers may have been louts or opportunists.’
    • ‘They would keep opportunists like him at several arms length.’
    • ‘Rowe said Jackson was a man being manipulated by opportunists, who kept information from him and wanted to milk millions of dollars out of him.’
    • ‘Instead, he allowed himself to be misled by the sycophants, opportunists and the parasitic financiers.’
    • ‘Such opportunists must not be given a chance to destabilise this country.’
    • ‘The opportunists know exactly what matters and it is always money or power.’
    • ‘However, police are convinced those responsible were organised car thieves and not opportunists.’
    • ‘They seem to have become a party of opportunists and I think that's where the problem for Meg lies.’
    • ‘There are opportunists who think of Diwali as a way to make a buck and sell it as a colorful commodity on the market.’
    • ‘Someone laboriously tills the land and the fruits are snatched away by the opportunists.’
    • ‘Most burglaries are carried out by opportunists when a house is empty.’

adjective

  • Opportunistic.

    ‘the calculating and opportunist politician’
    • ‘Nor is it all the fault of racist or opportunist politicians - but they hardly help.’
    • ‘They are the most glaringly opportunist bunch of hypocrites in politics.’
    • ‘Careless motorists whose vehicles are ‘shop windows’ for opportunist thieves have left a York beat officer at the end of his tether.’
    • ‘Police want to boost the numbers of residents participating in the scheme which is proven to cut crime and acts as a deterrent to opportunist thieves and intruders.’
    • ‘Customers visiting supermarkets in the town have been hit by opportunist criminals at both Somerfield and Waitrose in the High Street.’
    • ‘A simple device is being promoted to deter opportunist thieves.’
    • ‘‘I think they were opportunist thieves and happened to be in the area,’ she added.’
    • ‘Wife beating is not endorsed, although some opportunist clerics interpret that it is permissible.’
    • ‘Such information was priceless for opportunist burglars, he added.’
    • ‘There's not going to be an officer on every street corner at all times of day and night just waiting for that opportunist criminal.’
    • ‘I wonder what opportunist bandwagon he is planning to join this week?’
    • ‘The existing rules are so opaque it is difficult to avoid the impression they were drawn up in a spirit of opportunist ambiguity.’
    • ‘Nigel Corrigan, if only for that opportunist goal, will recall this final with pride.’
    • ‘To detail all the political twists and turns of this thoroughly opportunist outfit would require a small book.’
    • ‘And the middle-management drones who man these media outlets stations seem to be in awe of this opportunist trash-talker.’
    • ‘That loophole has been exploited by opportunist operators who produce watered-down spirits and market them as the real thing.’
    • ‘These are men and women who work not off of political ideals or even insight, but rather are driven by careerist ambition and opportunist fear.’
    • ‘Opportunism played an important part in my acquisition of data, in the same way that the subjects of study made their money from opportunist ventures.’
    • ‘What all these opportunist groups oppose, above all, is any independent role for the working class.’
    • ‘This flows organically from their opportunist politics.’

Origin

Late 19th century from opportune+ -ist.

Pronunciation

opportunist

/ɒpəˈtjuːnɪst/