Definition of orientate in English:

orientate

verb

British
another term for orient
  • ‘It is our memories that locate us, orientate us, and tell us in what direction we are hastening.’
  • ‘These are the basic stuff of any such text and a number of books orientated to soil and plant processes cover them.’
  • ‘They are arranged and orientated to allow own-door access as well as open deck and corridor access.’
  • ‘When the sundial is positioned so that both hour scales tell the same time it is orientated to the meridian and the time is revealed.’
  • ‘Mosquitoes and many other insects bask in flowers, orientating their bodies to absorb solar radiation.’
  • ‘On the other hand, solar heat gain is minimised by orientating the house with the long axis running east-west.’
  • ‘Made of billinga, a robust African hardwood, the walkways guide and orientate visitors around the site.’
  • ‘Could they be picking up magnetic signals to orientate themselves?’
  • ‘The building is orientated towards the north, as dictated by the topography, with the main entrances to the east and west.’
  • ‘The symbols are used, when necessary, as compasses - a clean, clever way of orientating the reader.’
  • ‘Visas can take time, as can learning the Cyrillic alphabet - essential for orientating yourself in town.’
  • ‘With the advent of the government's new programme, the ruling elite is now orientating itself towards just such a confrontation.’
  • ‘In this opening instalment the star guide shows users how to orientate themselves in the night sky and identify some of the more obvious constellations and stars.’
  • ‘In practice, the amount of open sky in view can be minimized by orientating openings toward buildings and trees, increasing plan area or lowering edges of the enclosure.’
  • ‘The resulting colour stripes help to orientate visitors and to define routes and zones within the park, using communication as link between topography and function.’
  • ‘You're orientating yourself around football.’
  • ‘Cholesterol is known to thicken phosphocholine bilayers by orientating the lipids in a more perpendicular fashion to the bilayer plane.’
  • ‘The chrome shroud has the mounting holes for the fans on both sides, allowing you to orientate the inlet and outlet ports as needed as well as of course being able to use 4 fans in a push-pull configuration.’
  • ‘Nevertheless, during inauguration festivities, some first-time visitors to the Concert Hall had difficulty orientating themselves through these interstitial zones.’
  • ‘Their teacher told Amelia that the Year 10 students were actually very good at orientating themselves in the city and although they won't admit it, they could use the public transport system really well.’

Origin

Mid 19th century probably a back-formation from orientation.

Pronunciation

orientate

/ˈɔːrɪənteɪt/ /ˈɒrɪənteɪt/