Definition of orthodoxy in English:

orthodoxy

nounorthodoxies

mass noun
  • 1Authorized or generally accepted theory, doctrine, or practice.

    ‘monetarist orthodoxy’
    count noun ‘he challenged many of the established orthodoxies’
    • ‘The practice of politics is based on rigid orthodoxies that defy empirical testing.’
    • ‘Radical innovators challenge the dogmas and the orthodoxies of the incumbents.’
    • ‘The Kharijites tolerated no slight deviance from their orthodoxies and ideas of morality.’
    • ‘He was distinctly nervous of orthodoxies and almost physically pained by rigid doctrinal systems.’
    • ‘To this extent the Lib Dem thinking on fiscal policy is firmly rooted in the orthodoxies of the 1970s.’
    • ‘The orthodoxies of fiscal rectitude and monetary restraint are no more.’
    • ‘One need not subscribe to orthodoxies - proper beliefs-in order to pray to God.’
    • ‘The apparent orthodoxy of forbidding all orthodoxies is a philosophical puzzle in liberalism since John Locke.’
    • ‘It is true that past scientific orthodoxies have themselves inspired policies that hindsight reveals to be seriously flawed.’
    • ‘His ideas themselves went against the dirigiste orthodoxies of his age and discipline, and earned him much disdain and opprobrium.’
    • ‘Rejecting orthodoxies and abstract theories alike, the neoconservatives tended to operate in close proximity to ongoing events.’
    • ‘New doctrinal and linguistic orthodoxies were put in place to institutionalize the gains made by revisionists in the name of pluralism and inclusivity.’
    • ‘The more basic problem lies in the undoubted decline, for a significant minority, of assent to previously popular orthodoxies and ideologies.’
    • ‘No-one should argue against teaching future citizens to think critically and to subject orthodoxies and truisms to rigorous examination.’
    • ‘Those who challenge widely accepted orthodoxies, believing them to rest on sand, will need to ensure that their own challenges have secure foundations.’
    • ‘Indeed, challenging public orthodoxies about the past in a constructive and sympathetic way is one of the most valuable contributions that the historian can make in the museum sector.’
    • ‘The cover tells us a lot about the book itself, particularly its aim which is to give designers a kick-start, an infusion of new ideas or challenge existing orthodoxies about Web design.’
    • ‘So in the end, the internet gives us the opportunity to make more nuanced expressions of our political worldview, which makes obsolete old orthodoxies and old definitions of left and right.’
    • ‘Rosenberg builds on Marx's work in order both to criticize prevailing orthodoxies in international relations theory and to develop an alternative theoretical position.’
    • ‘Emerson's worldview, repelled by orthodoxies, was open-ended, evolving, unspecified, rejecting all incarnations as strictly pro tern.’
    • ‘Socrates believed in the intrinsic value of asking honest questions and challenging orthodoxy.’
    • ‘He was a powerful figure in the Vatican and a guardian of orthodoxy for a very conservative pope.’
    • ‘She knows all about political correctness and challenging prevailing orthodoxy.’
    • ‘Holism was the unquestioned orthodoxy of the Western tradition of practising medicine and investigating nature for the two millennia before the nineteenth century.’
    doctrine, belief, conviction, creed, dogma, credo, theory, view, idea, tenet, teaching, practice, received wisdom, article of faith
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The quality of conforming to orthodox theories, doctrines, or practices.
      ‘writings of unimpeachable orthodoxy’
      • ‘Without tenure, job security would be a function of a professor's conformity to patriotic orthodoxy.’
      • ‘Sounds like the university is ‘requiring conformity with… orthodoxy of content and method.’’
      • ‘I also like Mill's querulous intolerance of the conformist pressure of orthodoxy and his impatience with unthoughtfulness.’
      • ‘What has edged into the mainstream of psychology is that which conforms to disciplinary orthodoxy.’
      • ‘Deregulation promotes programming in which mediocrity supersedes excellence, and conformity and orthodoxy are reinforced at the expense of diversity.’
      • ‘The usual proposals, however, conform to an orthodoxy based on unstated answers to these questions.’
      • ‘National Review has long bucked conservative orthodoxy on drug prohibition.’
      • ‘Greenspan made himself the living embodiment of the conservative market orthodoxy that still reigns over conventional opinion, despite its spectacular failures.’
      • ‘Saturn governs theories and scientific law, older persons, depth, patience, timing, tradition, conventionality, orthodoxy and productive use of time.’
      • ‘Traditional orthodoxy has long been passé at HDS and the intellectual influence on religion by the faculty has been negligible.’
      • ‘Made that much more sensitive by the premature death of his mother and the stern behavior of his father, he grows to reject his father's traditional orthodoxy only to assume them in his adult years.’
      • ‘Those who militantly defend the conservative orthodoxy in Australia see all change as an affront to the past, especially their view of the past.’
      • ‘The old nationalist orthodoxy had become by then the domain of a few cranks.’
      • ‘It basically conveys a sense of political hostility rather than religious rigidity, militancy, conservatism or orthodoxy.’
      • ‘Anarchism, like Coltrane, is the rational, syllogistic, positive rejection of convention and unjust orthodoxy.’
      • ‘Anglican orthodoxy and conservative political principles insisted on the value of existing institutions, while revolution, Romanticism, and the rise of democracy insisted on the necessity of progress.’
      • ‘During World War II, Mitterrand began the break with conservative orthodoxy that resulted in his becoming France's most influential Socialist politician.’
      • ‘The colonial experience thus induced a certain schizophrenia, where a tension persisted between the new world of warfare and the traditions of European orthodoxy.’
      • ‘Even conservative Christian voices now tell us that we must choose between a rigid market orthodoxy and ‘compassionate conservatism’.’
      • ‘Either they could choose to follow the latest will of Parliament, thereby preserving some remnant of traditional orthodoxy on sovereignty.’
      conventionality, conventionalism, conformism, conservatism, traditionalism, conformity, properness, propriety, correctness, doctrinalism, unoriginality
      View synonyms
  • 2The whole community of Orthodox Jews or Orthodox Christians.

    ‘she was brought up in orthodoxy’
    • ‘Finally, Wesley speaks of a present experience of Christian orthodoxy and of its effects in his life.’
    • ‘He goes on to claim that social theory is a poor reflection of Christian orthodoxy.’
    • ‘I wonder what part he daily participation in the liturgy in Christ Church Cathedral has played in this movement into orthodoxy.’
    • ‘But the Christian orthodoxy considered all such attempts blasphemous.’
    • ‘As a result of their simplistic attitude a narrow strand of Disciplinarian theology is inflated to embrace the whole of Reformed orthodoxy.’
    • ‘Newman has produced an understanding of history where the struggle between orthodoxy and heresy results in the eventual defeat of false belief.’
    • ‘Many forms of religious orthodoxy, Catholicism for one, that affirm a gap between human and divine morality have made their peace with democracy.’
    • ‘This bold optimism with its adherence to original innocence is one of his most attractive features, but it has also led his readers to question his Christian orthodoxy.’
    • ‘In the world of orthodoxy it is as though certain ‘Christian experiences’ are dangling in society waiting for individuals to have them.’
    • ‘Those who have observed the wider evangelical scene over the past two decades will hardly need to be told that a massive defection from Christian orthodoxy has been taking place.’
    • ‘‘I see from the standpoint of Christian orthodoxy,’ said southern writer Flannery O'Connor.’
    • ‘The violent enforcement of orthodoxy in Christian history is the necessary and logical consequence of seeing an institution as the agent and protector of transcendent truth.’
    • ‘This is from one of the great Theological Orations which he preached while there, speeches which have become known as bastions of Trinitarian and Christological orthodoxy.’
    • ‘The ambition is nothing less than to thoroughly discredit Newman as an apologist for Christian orthodoxy and - what is its counterpart - as a critic of liberalism.’
    • ‘For nearly two years he tried to adopt Day's anarcho-pacifist politics and her devotion to Catholic orthodoxy, while spending his evenings at the White Horse Tavern.’
    • ‘Both have theologies radically immersed in the gospel and in life at its darkest points, and are orthodoxly Christian in ways which show Christian orthodoxy to be anything but comfortable.’
    • ‘Like Theodorakis, Kazantzakis was deeply imbued with orthodoxy, with its rituals, its traditions, its beliefs-a very, very powerful part of his own culture.’
    • ‘Of the three dissenting denominations, it was the Congregationalists and the Calvinistic Baptists who stayed true to Christian orthodoxy as the seventeenth century gave way to the eighteenth.’
    • ‘Take orthodoxy away and the whole thing ceases to make sense.’

Origin

Mid 17th century via late Latin from late Greek orthodoxia ‘sound doctrine’, from orthodoxos (see orthodox).

Pronunciation

orthodoxy

/ˈɔːθədɒksi/