Definition of perforate in English:

perforate

See synonyms for perforate

Translate perforate into Spanish

transitive verb

[with object]
  • Pierce and make a hole or holes in.

    ‘there is a very small risk of the scope perforating the colon’
    • ‘the walls will be perforated with thousands of circular openings’
    • ‘Its buildings are wooden huts perforated by bullet holes.’
    • ‘Frozen in place, he noted how the red costume was perforated with holes of varying sizes, and that the flesh beneath was a sickly gray.’
    • ‘Typically, the instrument has seven finger holes and one thumb hole together with a flaring bell, often perforated by several sound holes.’
    • ‘The ring and disk were perforated by ten holes each, and gravity tended to align the holes ten times per revolution.’
    • ‘One side of each box is perforated with small holes and the opposite side is an open, plain square of light.’
    • ‘The cell wall is usually delicately ornamented and perforated by minute holes.’
    • ‘The page will also be perforated with the holder's image.’
    • ‘At one end it is equipped either with a finely woven basket-work bulb or one of metal perforated with minute holes, so as to prevent the particles of the tea leaves from being drawn up into the mouth.’
    • ‘Here, stiff strips of paper have been tinted a dull green or brown by a chlorophyll wash and perforated with a hole punch.’
    • ‘In rare cases the eardrum will become perforated (a hole will form in it), and pus will then be seen running out of the ear.’
    • ‘If there is fluid around the structure the appendix may have perforated.’
    • ‘The muscle is incorporated because it acts as a vehicle for perforating blood vessels that supply the overlying skin and fat and that originate from the deep inferior epigastric artery.’
    • ‘Instead, clusters of pits located almost anywhere along the vessel have perforated or porose pit membranes.’
    • ‘A possible explanation was that part of the disc being removed had perforated the artery - there was no suggestion that any surgical implement had caused the damage.’
    • ‘One of the stab wounds had perforated his heart.’
    • ‘During the routine operation, her bowel was perforated.’
    • ‘Many of the victims' eardrums have been perforated because of the noise.’
    • ‘His image perforated my train of thoughts for couple of hours.’
    • ‘It's a uniquely hard limestone that can be perforated in a way, he says, that no other limestone can.’
    • ‘From shoes to gloves to bags, it's no secret that perforated leather is in.’
    pierce, penetrate, enter, puncture, prick, bore through, riddle, hole, make holes in, punch holes in, put holes in
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

perforate

/ˈpərfəˌrāt/ /ˈpərfəˌreɪt/

adjective

Biology Medicine
  • Perforated.

    ‘a perforate shell’
    • ‘One possibility would be to look for preserved hyphae in Ediacaran fossils and in associated microbial mats, specifically hyphae with perforate cell walls.’
    • ‘All multinucleate and uninucleate components of the larva are connected by perforate plugged junctions.’
    • ‘The basic morphology consists of two nested, perforate cones connected by a series of septa.’
    • ‘The perforate, thin-walled structure to the bowl-shaped sponge is distinctive, particularly where the relatively close, but irregular, packing of the various ranked canals and ostia is evident.’
    • ‘Usually, an open surgical technique is performed to interrupt the flow of these incompetent perforate veins.’

Pronunciation

perforate

/ˈpərf(ə)rət/ /ˈpərfəˌrāt/ /ˈpərfəˌreɪt/

Origin

Late Middle English (as an adjective): from Latin perforat- ‘pierced through’, from the verb perforare, from per- ‘through’ + forare ‘pierce’.