Main definitions of perk in English

: perk1perk2perk3

perk1

Pronunciation /pərk/

Translate perk into Spanish

intransitive verb

[no object]perk up or perk someone/something up
  • Become or make more cheerful, lively, or interesting.

    no object ‘she'd been depressed, but she seemed to perk up last week’
    • ‘the coffee had perked him up long enough to tackle the reviews’
    • ‘So the demonstration, around 10 people shouting at once, perked things up a little.’
    • ‘I could barely detect the horseradish in the creamy bed of mashed potato, a more generous grating would have perked it up.’
    • ‘It's amazing how a bit of garlic and copious olive oil can perk things up.’
    • ‘Even the lemon wedge could not perk it up, nor could the minute bowl of rice and broiled tomato au gratin that accompanied it.’
    • ‘The 1st film was bad, but it had comedy moments in it to perk it up.’
    • ‘Even though it's early in the morning, and breakfast hasn't yet been served, this statement perks some people up.’
    • ‘Three divisions of the National Guard stationed nearby perked things up a bit for most businesses.’
    • ‘I thought the lemon rind perked it up, but Lisa thought it was too lemony.’
    • ‘Well that's just the thing to perk my spirits up.’
    • ‘There was nothing like a little betting to perk his spirits up.’
    • ‘Just when things bog down, she arrives on cue to perk it up.’
    • ‘Remove the glass from a photo frame and perk it up with phrases that complement a family snapshot.’
    • ‘Just seeing Elizabeth on a wrestling show normally would perk it up just a little bit.’
    • ‘If he perks up or seems interested in talking, stay put.’
    • ‘I perked up a bit when I heard I would have my horses soon.’
    • ‘I perked up immediately and could see Don's interest gaining as well.’
    • ‘Tina perked up instantly, threw her arms around his neck, and kissed his cheek.’
    • ‘Bryce perked up instantly, grabbing the chance to stall with relish.’
    • ‘But then he perked up slightly, a sly grin coming onto his face.’
    • ‘The kid had perked up considerably, and he hoped it was going to last.’
    cheer up, brighten, brighten up, become more cheerful, become livelier, feel happier, take heart, be heartened, liven up, revive
    cheer up, liven up, brighten up, make more cheerful, make more lively, make happier, raise someone's spirits, give someone heart, give someone a boost, give someone a lift, revitalize, invigorate, energize, enliven, ginger up, put new heart into, put new life into, add some zest to, put some spark into, rejuvenate, refresh, vitalize, vivify, wake up
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the senses ‘perch’ and ‘be lively’): perhaps from an Old French dialect variant of percher ‘to perch’.

Main definitions of perk in English

: perk1perk2perk3

perk2

Pronunciation /pərk/

Translate perk into Spanish

noun

  • 1usually perksinformal Money, goods, or other benefit to which one is entitled as an employee or as a shareholder of a company.

    • ‘many agencies are helping to keep personnel at their jobs by providing perks’
    • ‘They gave me time off to go climb mountains, and I was entitled to other perks like staff travel.’
    • ‘My host worked in an executive capacity for a large multinational company, a chauffeur-driven BMW being among the perks of her job.’
    • ‘And the job has its perks, including occasional dates with rock icons.’
    • ‘In time they usually become people who care more about the perks of their job: mini-bars, expense accounts, fat salaries.’
    • ‘Both companies offer health insurance, share options and performance incentives as more financially tangible perks of the job.’
    • ‘Workers in the tourism sector can expect a variety of perks, which sometimes include accommodation and staff discounts.’
    • ‘One of the perks of my job is being able to go to swell places like this.’
    • ‘This is one of the perks of the job, that occasionally you meet interesting celebrities.’
    • ‘One of the perks of the job is free tickets to local gigs.’
    • ‘But in practice, it has been a free-for-all, according to those who have enjoyed the perks of the job.’
    • ‘One of the perks of the job was free access to the artificial snow slope.’
    • ‘That's one of the perks of the job, getting music long before it hits the shops.’
    • ‘And his head isn't turned by the perks of the job.’
    • ‘The most overrated part of the job is the status-oriented perks.’
    • ‘The perks of his job include free tyres and mufflers!’
    • ‘One of the perks of her job was it left her with a lot of down time.’
    • ‘Many government employees who could not otherwise afford these things get them as perks of the job.’
    • ‘The cop, increasingly pleased with the perks of this job, goes into the theater.’
    • ‘Many miners felt, in fact, that the right to collect was one of the few perks of the job.’
    • ‘One of the perks of this job is getting to drive a lot of cars that I will never be able to afford.’
    1. 1.1An advantage or benefit following from a job or situation.
      • ‘they were busy discovering the perks of town life’
      • ‘Anyone with a credit card can take advantage of the perks once reserved for a spoiled few.’
      • ‘This is the work of a writer who became a pop star by mistake, but discovered that the perks are better and stuck with it.’
      • ‘Practicing medicine in a small town has its perks.’
      • ‘The sand and mud can be quite a toxic mix for bicycles so be sure to take advantage of this perk.’
      • ‘If the cash is not returned in time, investors may miss the chance to take advantage of this year's tax perks.’
      • ‘Sometimes it takes some extra perks to get the whole family to go boating - this year's line of great ‘toys’ will do the job.’
      • ‘Extra perks include fast shutter advance and a lens that accepts 49 mm SLR screw-on accessories.’
      • ‘All museums rely on the kindness of private and corporate donors, many of whom expect to be wooed with special perks or consideration.’
      • ‘Depending on the hospice's resources, there may be extra perks, such as art, touch and music therapy.’
      • ‘And there are a couple of extra perks thrown in, too.’
      • ‘Cruise lines may reward your loyalty by adding perks to the deal.’
      • ‘Our 800-plus panelists are prohibited from accepting perks, and clubs can be banned from the competition simply for offering them.’
      • ‘The discounters then successfully beat the majors at their own game, adding perks such as satellite TV, leather seats and extra legroom.’
      • ‘The zone will give tax perks to businesses providing maintenance, repair and overhaul services to domestic and foreign airlines.’
      • ‘For some, the up-front economic perks of mining sweeten the assessment of the anticipated social and environmental impact on the community.’
      • ‘The main feature is, of course, a trip to Caesars Palace with plenty of perks and gift certificates to smooth away the sorrow of losing the Oscar.’
      • ‘Push-ups offer many other perks that you may be unaware of.’
      • ‘They enjoy superior grade vehicles, drivers and many other perks.’
      • ‘They enjoy such perks as dormitory living, television and a well-equipped gym.’
      • ‘As an extra perk, hotel guests with wireless laptops can use the Wi-Fi network free of charge.’

Origin

Early 19th century abbreviation of perquisite.

Main definitions of perk in English

: perk1perk2perk3

perk3

Pronunciation /pərk/

Translate perk into Spanish

intransitive verb

[no object]informal
  • 1(of coffee) percolate.

    • ‘while the coffee perks, head out for the morning paper’
    • ‘A pot of coffee already sat perking, filling the room with its rich aroma.’
    • ‘Sitting on the sky blue counter as her coffee perked, Kina silently swore.’
    • ‘As the coffee perked, she crawled through the door into the cabin looking a pale shade of green.’
    • ‘Inside the theatre is cozy but not extremely inviting (unless you like vending machine snacks and perked coffee).’
    • ‘He tried to get his mind back on training as he took another sip of the freshly perked coffee.’
    • ‘No matter whether you prefer espresso, drip, perked, or pressed, you need to start with high-quality gourmet coffee beans to get a good cup of coffee.’
    1. 1.1with object Percolate (coffee).

Origin

1930s abbreviation of percolate.

Pronunciation

perk

/pərk/