Main definitions of puss in English

: puss1puss2

puss1

Translate puss into Spanish

noun

informal mainly British
  • 1An affectionate term for a cat.

    • ‘dangly baubles can be too tantalizing for even the best behaved pusses’
    • ‘While licking its claws, puss leaves a collection of the organism there, which in turn becomes yours when the cat scratches you.’
    • ‘I sat next to puss on the couch again but Sam never left the door.’
    • ‘This does not amuse either puss who associate feathered birds with fair game and dinner.’
    • ‘Catfights also cause nasty abscesses that result in pain and trips to the vet for puss.’
    • ‘Even the mildest mannered little pooch or the purrfect pet puss will bite and scratch savagely when injured.’
    • ‘‘Ah, there you are, puss,’ the gentleman said in a pinched voice, his attention on Croft.’
    • ‘A pretty puss Sophie came second in a beautiful pet competition - despite being dead.’
    feline
  • 2A playful or coquettish girl or young woman.

    • ‘you are an impudent puss, Miss Alice’
    • ‘All the better for hearing that you're safe and well, puss.’
    • ‘What made you think there's an intruder, puss?’
    • ‘‘Don't get all huffy, puss,’ Louis said gently.’
    • ‘‘Don't worry, puss,’ he said, heading out of the room.’
    • ‘‘You're getting me into trouble, puss,’ Louis would say reproachfully.’

Pronunciation

puss

/po͝os/ /pʊs/

Origin

Early 16th century probably from Middle Low German pūs (also pūskatte) or Dutch poes, of unknown origin.

Main definitions of puss in English

: puss1puss2

puss2

Translate puss into Spanish

noun

Irish, Scottish
  • A person's face or mouth.

    ‘they hush up with little smiles on their pusses’
    • ‘look at the long puss on him—you'd think he'd be happy for his brother’
    • ‘There was nothing more exasperating than the snug puss of my Dublin work colleague as he entered the office the morning after.’
    • ‘He had a right puss on him when he lifted it down off the stool.’
    • ‘Everybody says she always had a puss on her face, and I always smiled.’
    • ‘In any case, after looking at his smug puss for an hour or so, I'm far more likely to pass on the son and vote for the parents.’
    • ‘As for Specter - we're sick to death of seeing his puss.’
    face, features, physiognomy, profile

Pronunciation

puss

/po͝os/ /pʊs/

Origin

Mid 19th century from Irish pus ‘lip, mouth’.