Main definitions of reading in English

: reading1Reading2

reading1

noun

  • 1mass noun The action or skill of reading.

    ‘the reading of a will’
    ‘suggestions for further reading’
    as modifier ‘reading skills’
    • ‘More than just reading skills are impaired, you can count on it.’
    • ‘A country of ten-year-olds should concentrate on their reading and comprehension skills.’
    • ‘His reading and writing skills have also dramatically changed.’
    • ‘He has courageously promised to drive up student test scores in core skills such as reading and math.’
    • ‘Paired reading can improve language skills as well as help motivate students to read on their own.’
    • ‘And reading is a skill just like playing tennis, or playing rugby or playing the piano.’
    • ‘The acquisition of reading and writing skills was a socially selective process.’
    • ‘One in ten pupils are leaving school in the Blackburn and Darwen area without basic reading and writing skills.’
    • ‘It seems that the brain takes sides in promoting the skills necessary for proficient reading.’
    • ‘The teens were hampered by poor reading and research skills and were more prone to leave a site after encountering difficulties.’
    • ‘This will be followed rapidly by early reading and counting skills.’
    • ‘A child with a learning disability may have goals in the areas of improving reading and math skills.’
    • ‘Tutored children were assessed on several measures of basic reading and spelling skills.’
    • ‘This necessitates somewhat cursory reading at times and I don't catch everything.’
    • ‘The test covers the skills of reading, writing, listening and speaking.’
    • ‘Something else Seamus discovered was the lack of basic reading and writing skills among the prison population.’
    • ‘And did you find that your reading and writing skills improved once you came here?’
    • ‘Like many of their colleagues, they say the centre has greatly improved their reading and writing skills.’
    • ‘As an academic I would argue that reading is one of the most basic skills needed to achieve academically.’
    • ‘The perception of irony reveals the gap between narrative memory and linear reading.’
    perusal, study, scan, scanning, scrutiny
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Written or printed matter that can be read.
      ‘his main reading was detective stories’
      with adjective ‘I found the article fascinating reading’
      • ‘These biographies make fascinating reading filled with personal memories.’
      • ‘Your CV on the Department of Education's website makes for fascinating reading.’
      • ‘Also on that page is some fascinating reading about how earthquakes prove that the Earth is hollow.’
      • ‘His books are not easy reading; he saw writing as a form of action, paragraphs as a hail of bullets.’
      • ‘Maybe their map reading or compass reading is not very good.’
      • ‘Other people do, and sometimes they make fascinating reading.’
      • ‘It's not like they're books someone would normally want to read for light reading!’
      • ‘Personal insults aside, it makes for fascinating reading - do peruse it, if you've got time.’
      • ‘The music is exhilaratingly presented; detailed liner notes make excellent reading.’
      • ‘A quick trawl through the record books makes depressing reading.’
      • ‘In fact, most of the letters make depressing reading, so I'll move on!’
      • ‘The diary entries and letters in this collection make for fascinating reading.’
      • ‘He can read only functional reading, he can read train stops, things like that.’
      • ‘An outsider's account of the machinations involved makes fascinating reading.’
      • ‘This makes fascinating reading, at least for a biologist like myself with a different specialisation from theirs.’
      • ‘These full accounts of her extraordinary career make fascinating and inspiring reading.’
      • ‘This fine set of essays is very good reading as we head into the presidential elections.’
      • ‘To promote the transition from dictionary articles to such further reading is no mean achievement.’
      • ‘Early works covering Norfolk ornithology make fascinating reading.’
      • ‘Coursework aims at the development of technical and conceptual skills through readings, homework, group projects, and lectures.’
    2. 1.2usually with adjective Knowledge of literature.
      ‘a man of wide reading’
      • ‘Yet it is no surprise that the man who emerges in these pages should be so broadly intelligent, with a wide reading and knowledge of the arts.’
      • ‘These are the fruit of her intense and wide reading in primary literature.’
      • ‘It is my firm belief, based on experience and fairly wide reading, that they are wrong.’
      • ‘The book is peppered with numerous brief illustrations drawn from the author's experience and wide reading.’
      • ‘He combines this collective biography with extensive reading of the popular literature.’
      • ‘The role of wide reading and the centrality of LITERATURE in language development were also emphasized.’
      • ‘This notion he argues with great verve, based on extensive reading in original literature.’
      • ‘By avid reading of the literature, I already knew half of the material, so I excelled.’
      • ‘Much of what Orme tells us is familiar, though he brings the fruits of very wide reading to enrich the discourse.’
      • ‘Their thinking cannot be based on wide reading or a deep and sustained engagement with issues.’
      • ‘This is a very good book, in which Mr Ackroyd deploys his enormously wide reading to great effect.’
      • ‘Inevitably this book is a work of synthesis based on wide reading in secondary sources.’
      • ‘His book is based on wide reading, numerous interviews, and extensive archival research.’
      • ‘Caldwell's book is based on wide reading, but I did note a few errors.’
      • ‘Flanagan supplemented his history classes at high school with a considerable amount of wide reading.’
      • ‘It is very very uncommon for me to be in the company of people who seem to be educated and who have knowledge due to their reading and gatherings.’
      learning, book learning, scholarship, education, erudition, knowledge, knowledge of literature
      View synonyms
  • 2An occasion at which pieces of literature are read to an audience.

    ‘a poetry reading’
    • ‘She was an accomplished reader of her own verse, and found a new young audience at the poetry readings which flourished in the 1960s.’
    • ‘Hence, perhaps, her later insistence on singing to the captive audiences at her poetry readings.’
    • ‘They also gained wider audiences through public readings in both poetry and prose.’
    • ‘These include poetry readings, concerts of romantic music, films, street theatre and special masses at St Valentine's church for engaged couples and wedding anniversaries.’
    • ‘Other events will include a Victorian picnic cricket match, concerts and poetry readings, horse-drawn carriage rides, guided walks and a rowing club regatta.’
    • ‘Have you ever gotten up in front of a crowd for anything like karaoke, poetry readings, or open-mic stand-up comedy?’
    • ‘The scholarship provides free entry to all lectures, poetry readings, exhibitions and concerts during the week of the Summer School.’
    • ‘The poetry readings, lunchtime concerts, museum exhibits and jam sessions add to this week of swing in the spring.’
    • ‘A collection of poetry readings read to a background of traditional Irish airs and classical music was launched in Sligo last week.’
    • ‘My best friend Larry and I were attending weekly open mic poetry readings at one of the local watering holes.’
    • ‘They assured us we had caused no problem and continued to tell us about their open-mic nights for poetry readings every Monday.’
    • ‘As in most areas of show business, the audience for readings is as important as the performer.’
    • ‘Poetry readings cannot help being a little self-conscious, and the audience's guffaws seemed a rather apt reflection upon the event.’
    • ‘There were other events there on the weekdays, such as poetry readings and open mic nights.’
    • ‘Kathleen Jamie is the latest in a line of present-day poets who are attracting large audiences to the Grasmere readings.’
    • ‘One afternoon was filled with poetry readings, theatrical performances and dance numbers.’
    • ‘As a result, the museum decided to improve amenities such as the store and restaurant, and to host events including poetry readings, recitals, and concerts.’
    • ‘But over the past twenty years there has been a fundamental change in the role poetry readings play in literary culture.’
    • ‘The singer showed off the book's colourful illustrations to the youngsters, but ended her reading after five minutes.’
    • ‘All fifteen will then read from their work at an open public reading at 3pm.’
    • ‘One of the reasons his novel had been such a hit was because he had appeared at several readings during Jewish Book Month.’
    • ‘When I do a public reading I often swap words around from how they appear on the page.’
    • ‘These stories cast an enduring spell on Clarke, who will appear in Seattle for two readings this week.’
    • ‘We arrived in Manhattan two days before the ceremony for some readings and other promotional appearances.’
    1. 2.1A piece of literature or passage of scripture that is read aloud.
      ‘readings from the Bible’
      • ‘The combined choirs will sing the traditional carols of the Christmas season and in addition there will be readings from Sacred Scripture.’
      • ‘There are many ways, but today let's focus on two, both of which are related to the Scripture readings we will hear at Mass.’
      • ‘Each service includes short scripture readings, petitions regarding mourning, suggestions for reflection, and room for journaling.’
      • ‘Both will respond to activities such as poetry read aloud, choral readings with repetitious phrasing, and intentional changes of voice.’
      • ‘This makes the course particularly appropriate for people who do the Scripture readings in their local church.’
      • ‘After breakfast, there are readings of scripture and meditation and after that each embarks on the chore which he has been given responsibility for.’
      • ‘This year's service was without a sermon, but the prayers and scripture readings provided all the spiritual inspiration required.’
      • ‘Today, I need to put aside the Scripture readings appointed for today.’
      • ‘Ken and Mary recited the readings from scripture with real feeling.’
      • ‘I have often read these words from my book at public readings, but now I am no longer the author reading them.’
      • ‘In addition to the seven devotions, the CD has Scripture readings, prayers, hymns and church information.’
      • ‘After the Gospel is read, the priest delivers a homily based on the Scripture readings.’
      • ‘There the famous chants are sung, interspersed with Scripture readings and periods of silence.’
      • ‘There was seven weeks of Scripture readings and the children showed a genuine interest and appreciation towards the course.’
      • ‘This week's scripture readings clearly chart the Epiphany theme, that of Jesus drawing all of humanity into a living relationship with God.’
      • ‘In this short reading, Dempster read five of his poems from his recent book.’
      • ‘Services could include requested pieces of music, readings or poetry, and range from being simple, quiet affairs to New Orleans-style funerals complete with jazz band.’
      • ‘Over the next hour or so, speeches and waiata, a reading and another prayer revisit the same themes.’
      • ‘This story never appears in our church's assigned cycle of Sunday readings.’
      • ‘Fr. Walsh also spoke of the high regard in which she was held within the family circle and this was clearly reflected in the readings at Mass by her young relatives.’
      passage, lesson
      View synonyms
  • 3A particular interpretation of a text or situation.

    ‘feminist readings of Goethe’
    • ‘It won't be a perfect fit, any more than modern feminist readings of the Bible are a perfect fit, but it will do for the time being.’
    • ‘McLeish believes it is the combination of strength, skill and also his reading of the game which makes him so difficult to play against.’
    • ‘He isn't as fast as Cole, but has tremendous skill and reading of the game.’
    • ‘How your own perceptions color your reading of those comments may be another story.’
    • ‘I do not wish to suggest that our reading of these narratives can be closed or definitive.’
    • ‘The article gives an intriguing and powerfully written reading of the ironic positioning of such films.’
    • ‘So this will hopefully prepare for a more sympathetic reading of the translated article below.’
    • ‘This is a pure absurdity, as any fair reading of the pages we have devoted to such matters can demonstrate.’
    • ‘On an absolutely literal reading, your Lordships' liberty to apply does not apply to past expenses if there are future expenses.’
    • ‘Perhaps readers will disagree with the Professor's comparative reading.’
    • ‘A more literal reading relates us directly to the pattern of the cosmos, with its insistence on the separation of categories.’
    • ‘In Nina's case, however, a literal reading would have given any security man grounds for anxiety.’
    • ‘Also, a naive reading would imagine that this knowledge on the fringe is the easiest to change.’
    • ‘That view is a tendentious reading of the legal materials, as a quick glance at Article I reveals.’
    • ‘However, I also think that a careful reading of the document shows the bishops were not saying this.’
    • ‘That's an utterly inaccurate reading of the great documents of the founding of this nation.’
    • ‘An honest reading of the document shows that the Vatican is simply banning gays.’
    • ‘A close reading of the document suggests, however, that the threat has been exaggerated.’
    • ‘It also means that everyone's experience of the book will be different - the order in which the stories are read will change readings of the book as a whole significantly.’
    • ‘Some people sneer at a metaphorical reading of scripture and Tolkien himself was opposed to allegory as a rhetorical form.’
    interpretation, construal, understanding, account, explanation, analysis, construction
    View synonyms
  • 4A figure or amount shown by a meter or other measuring instrument.

    ‘radiation readings were taken every hour’
    • ‘To reduce measurement error, this instrument takes three readings and computes an average.’
    • ‘If there is a large discrepancy between the water meter readings and the amount of water shown on the bill, a specialist is sent to investigate the problem.’
    • ‘Even frequent meter readings provided information about energy use after the fact, not allowing actions to be taken to reduce energy use or energy demand.’
    • ‘You are told to beware of persons coming to your house under the pretext of selling or repairing things, conducting meter readings, etc.’
    • ‘The bottom figure, the diastolic reading, is the pressure when your heart is filling (diastole).’
    • ‘There will still be a 10-15 per cent variation between readings on meters and lab values.’
    • ‘It had been a year, and the meters were giving normal readings across the board for air quality and temperature.’
    • ‘Fig. 11 indicated that the clip gauge transducer produced a linear relationship between the diameter change and the strain meter readings.’
    • ‘The data to be traded includes numerical instrument readings, high-resolution x-rays, and audio/video discussions.’
    • ‘The readings we measure therefore reflect upper torso movement.’
    • ‘It is evident from different reports that many of the meters are giving erratic readings.’
    • ‘Knob positions and meter readings are easily seen from a distance.’
    • ‘Distances still refer to yards or miles, weights are in pounds and ounces, and temperature readings are in Fahrenheit.’
    • ‘We will also be offering to provide quarterly meter readings.’
    • ‘Whichever type of thermometer you choose, be sure you know how to use it correctly to get an accurate reading.’
    • ‘Lavelle gave a blood sample at the scene which gave a reading of 188.The legal limit is 80.’
    • ‘He appeared to be drunk and a breath test gave a reading of 125 micrograms of alcohol in 100 millilitres of breath.’
    • ‘This appears to be the message from the first opinion poll readings since hostilities broke out.’
    • ‘The instant new information is entered, the appropriate dashboard readings are updated companywide.’
    • ‘The variant readings have been reduced to seven, each of which is regarded as equally valid.’
    record, figure, indication, read-out, display, measurement
    View synonyms
  • 5A stage of debate in parliament through which a Bill must pass before it can become law.

    ‘the Bill returns to the House for its final reading next week’
    • ‘This bill still awaits the final reading and approval by Parliament.’
    • ‘Parliament approved their final reading on April 3 after much controversy.’
    • ‘It must pass two more readings in coming weeks before it is final.’
    • ‘He said he expects the Bill to have a bumpy ride as it goes through further readings and committee stages.’
    • ‘If MPs approve the bill at its third and final reading in Parliament next week it will be passed for Royal Assent and become law.’
    • ‘Rather than go through lengthy readings and committee stages, the laws would be a voted on in both houses of parliament after a 90-minute debate.’
    • ‘The bylaw passed three readings and needs final adoption by council in likely a couple of weeks before becoming enforceable.’
    • ‘Tung's sudden change of position came after the business-oriented Liberal Party refused to back the bill's final readings at the legislature Wednesday.’
    • ‘On Friday, the Hong Kong Bar Association said it deplores any decision to resume the final readings of the bill next Wednesday.’
    • ‘It is with pleasure that I stand in the House to speak to the final reading of this bill.’
    • ‘Come the final readings of these bills, the Government flip-flops.’
    • ‘Indeed, only a provision of the rules which interprets an abstention as a vote in favour in the event of a tie saw the bill past its final reading.’
    • ‘I have not spoken during the previous readings of the bill, because I wanted to hear all sides and to come to a considered decision.’
    • ‘All the ministers, as well as the Financial Secretary, spoke in supporting the need for the bill, which received its three readings and finally passed unopposed.’
    • ‘Heavyweight hitters went down swinging against federal Bill C - 2, which had its final readings in the Senate this week.’
    • ‘Once that has been done, council can choose to add the smoke-free question to the fall election ballot instead of passing the bylaw on final readings.’
    • ‘The Green Party supports this bill and will do so through to the final reading.’
    • ‘I am happy to be here to support the third reading of this bill.’
    • ‘By 316 votes to 311, the government's education bill passed its second reading in parliament.’
    • ‘Mr Robson's bill passed its first reading in Parliament 78 votes to 41.’

Pronunciation

reading

/ˈriːdɪŋ/

Main definitions of Reading in English

: reading1Reading2

Reading2

proper noun

  • A town in Berkshire, southern England, on the River Kennet near its junction with the River Thames; population 142,300 (est. 2009).

Pronunciation

Reading

/ˈrɛdɪŋ/