Definition of regroup in English:

regroup

verb

  • Reassemble or cause to reassemble into organized groups, typically after being attacked or defeated.

    no object ‘by November 1971 the opposition was regrouping’
    with object ‘he regrouped his fighters in the hills’
    • ‘It is not known whether they retain a low profile because the state has taken over most of the field or for tactical reasons, while proceeding to regroup and reorganize themselves.’
    • ‘Unable to hold the city, he managed the evacuation adroitly, regrouping his forces at White Plains.’
    • ‘His mission in the counter-offensive was to regroup his armies and seize Rostov-on-Don.’
    • ‘The military were inclined to see evacuation as a capitulation rather than as an orderly way of regrouping the civilian population.’
    • ‘Pershing now had forty-two US divisions at his disposal, each twice the size of its European counterpart, and was able to regroup them in a single army - later divided into two - on the right of the Allied line.’
    • ‘If the night attack develops the daytime success there should be no gap between the day and night actions so that the enemy could not gain time to move in reserves and fighting equipment or regroup its forces.’
    • ‘Between the slow moving drift of enormous floating meteors, the group of frigates drift through in order to regroup their attack.’
    • ‘It then dawned on me it was my job to regroup the troops.’
    • ‘He left in a fast gallop toward the field to regroup his troops and leave the place.’
    • ‘There's no place to back out and make contact at another location or regroup your troops.’
    • ‘There's no place to back out and make contact at another location or regroup your troops.’
    • ‘He left in a fast gallop toward the field to regroup his troops and leave the place.’
    dramatic change, radical change, drastic alteration, radical alteration, complete shift, sea change, metamorphosis, transformation, conversion, innovation, breakaway

Pronunciation

regroup

/riːˈɡruːp/