Definition of rescue in English:

rescue

Pronunciation /ˈreskyo͞o/ /ˈrɛskju/

Translate rescue into Spanish

transitive verbrescues, rescuing, rescued

[with object]
  • 1Save (someone) from a dangerous or distressing situation.

    ‘firemen were called out to rescue a man trapped in the river’
    • ‘A teenager has thanked fire crews who saved his life by rescuing him from a blazing inferno.’
    • ‘Firefighters had to rescue four people trapped in their vehicles.’
    • ‘What makes people risk their lives to rescue someone trapped in a burning house or drowning in a river?’
    • ‘Two women who tried to battle a wall of flames to rescue a man trapped in his blazing home were today praised by firefighters.’
    • ‘His lawyer has suggested that the jury could convict him of manslaughter by gross negligence for not rescuing her.’
    • ‘The plan must include procedures for rescuing workers who have fallen but are unable to rescue themselves.’
    • ‘A taxi driver told today how he helped lift a car with his bare hands to rescue a child trapped in a road accident.’
    • ‘Alisha was eventually rescued by firefighters from her bedroom, after a chip pan fire engulfed the kitchen in flames.’
    • ‘The female tabby is seeking a reunion with her owners after being dramatically rescued by firefighters.’
    • ‘The men were winched to safety and became the first people rescued by helicopter off the coast of Ireland.’
    • ‘Two crewmen died, but the remaining 20 were eventually rescued by the lifeboat.’
    • ‘The Norwegian ship then rescued the 430 people.’
    • ‘One member of the crew was rescued by a US Navy helicopter, and did not suffer serious injury.’
    • ‘He was trapped underneath until he was rescued by a fire crew.’
    • ‘They were rescued yesterday off the coast of Ireland.’
    • ‘Four dogs, a kitten and a collection of snakes and lizards were rescued unharmed.’
    • ‘Four other miners were injured and eight were rescued unharmed.’
    • ‘Both mother and son suffered in the cold water, but were rescued essentially unhurt.’
    • ‘He later crashed the plane into the sea and was rescued relatively unhurt.’
    • ‘Hundreds of people are still waiting to be rescued from the rooftops of homes and buildings.’
    save, save from danger, save the life of, come to the aid of
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    1. 1.1informal Keep from being lost or abandoned; retrieve.
      • ‘he got out of his chair to rescue his cup of coffee’
      • ‘Now that he had rescued his belongings from the desert sand and pilfering fingers, he felt like a large weight had been lifted off his shoulders so he decided to stay a few more days and give them the benefit of his expertise.’
      • ‘The yellow phenotype was completely rescued in all five lines.’
      • ‘When it comes to her tennis, she is bright enough to construct a point, strong enough to wallop a point and fast enough to rescue a lost cause.’
      • ‘He rescued his bag, and clinging to the poles he somehow managed to crawl up the ice foot, but he was pretty wet and soon very cold.’
      • ‘Yet the action still wasn't over with the away side determined to rescue some lost pride.’
      • ‘Several troubled companies saw their share prices boosted by the possibility that they could be rescued by a buy-out.’
      • ‘"Oops," he shrugged as he rescued his coffee out of Cameron's hand which was currently in danger of dropping to the floor.’
      • ‘Robbie was rescued from obscurity and has shone at Leeds.’
      • ‘He is the world-renowned authority and registrar on the species he rescued from obscurity.’
      • ‘The " little Chinese girl " was rescued from oblivion at the eleventh hour.’
      • ‘But the club was only rescued from extinction earlier this year by the new chairman.’
      • ‘The relationship counselling service has been rescued from the brink of closure in west and north Wiltshire.’
      • ‘John rescued his coffee from the confusion and leaned back in his chair to admire his son.’
      • ‘He is there to plead for their life; that they be rescued from obscurity.’
      • ‘Another is a minuscule, dead-end space that was rescued from oblivion by a wall fountain and a pond.’
      retrieve, recover, salvage, get back
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noun

  • 1An act of saving or being saved from danger or distress.

    ‘he came to our rescue with a loan of $100’
    • ‘In an amazing stroke of luck for the sick patient, all three people who came to his rescue were health workers.’
    • ‘Two men passing by dramatically came to their rescue and managed to reach them using the branches from nearby trees.’
    • ‘A TEENAGER'S boyfriend came to her rescue when she was dragged to the ground by another youngster on Thursday.’
    • ‘She initially passed out, but quickly recovered and tried to hold her brains in for over an hour until someone noticed and came to her rescue.’
    • ‘But after a quick sleep it didn't take long before a speedboat came to my rescue.’
    • ‘Thankfully, two young girls who worked in the barn came to our rescue.’
    • ‘Janet was full of praise for the police officer who came to her rescue.’
    • ‘Luckily his shouting disturbed the family of the house who came to his rescue.’
    • ‘While he was being attacked, the two police officials came to his rescue.’
    • ‘He described being involved in a number of heroic rescues including rescuing a woman from a burning car, saving a child from being run over and preventing an old woman being mugged.’
    • ‘The crew were always spared the task so they could save energy for the impending rescue.’
    • ‘In order to save lives, we still have rescues and search and rescue operations ongoing.’
    • ‘Tens of thousands of workers were involved in the rescue and cleanup effort.’
    • ‘Over the years the Air Corps have been responsible for numerous successful rescues.’
    • ‘He worked his way up through the ranks - his experiences range from carrying out cliff rescues to passing on knowledge as a training instructor.’
    • ‘Residents were furious that they had to organise an attempted rescue of survivors.’
    • ‘Let's begin our coverage of the dramatic rescue of nine trapped coal miners in Pennsylvania.’
    • ‘"Well, miss, I want to thank you for your daring rescue today.’
    • ‘Coastguards from England carried out the rescue off the coast of Cornwall.’
    • ‘I had always envisioned a sort of heroic rescue, but those were only dreams.’
    saving, rescuing
    help, assist, aid, lend a helping hand to, lend a hand to, bail out
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    1. 1.1as modifier Denoting or relating to a domestic animal that has been removed from a situation of abuse or neglect by a welfare organization.
      ‘adopting a rescue cat may be one of the most rewarding things you will ever do’
      • ‘some people find their ideal pet in a rescue shelter’
      • ‘I have an old rescue cat staying with me called Snowflake.’
      • ‘Last night I had an unexpected trip to the vets with Cassius, our first rescue cat who's been with us nearly 2 years now.’
      • ‘My grandmother had always owned a cat, and later in life she started adopting rescue cats from the local Cats Protection League.’
      • ‘Three of my five cats have been rescue cats, and one is the son of a rescued animal.’
      • ‘Rescue cats should be kept inside for at least their first few weeks in their new home.’
      • ‘A one-eyed rescue pooch has proved you do not need a pedigree to be a top dog at the world-famous Crufts.’
      • ‘The pair performed together as part of a rescue agility team at the world-famous dog show on Saturday morning.’
      • ‘The winner of the fancy dress class was Jane Maitland from Drumcliffe with a rescue dog called Patches.’
      • ‘The joy of helping a rescue dog is incredible.’
      • ‘She was a rescue dog from a puppy mill where she spent her first four or five years in horrible conditions in a cage.’
      • ‘For 26 years Jackie ran a rescue home for rabbits in Hythe.’
      • ‘A woman has hit out at an animal rescue home after being prevented from having a dog because she was too old and on income support.’
      • ‘I told my daughter that I was willing to donate up to 5,000 pounds to anyone who would set up a rescue home for the stray dogs here.’
      • ‘Just before Christmas 2000, a friend was hosting a cocktail party for dogs at a rescue shelter.’
      • ‘This guide is written to help show first-time adopters what to expect when adopting an animal from a rescue shelter.’
      • ‘She recently adopted a St. Bernard from a rescue shelter and while the dog is a handful, she's really enjoying it.’
      • ‘I may be getting a rescue goldfish today.’
      • ‘Jeremy came back from the show with Tinker, a full-grown longhaired female, who, they told him, was a rescue hamster.’
      • ‘If you are considering taking on a rescue pet, do find out all the information you can about the animal.’
      • ‘The home is now appealing for those looking for a pet to choose a rescue animal.’
    2. 1.2as modifier Denoting the emergency excavation of archaeological sites threatened by imminent building or road development.
      ‘they have not always been keen to organize rescue excavations to investigate these sites’
      • ‘My sixth form tutor gave me days off to help on rescue excavations.’
      • ‘The discovery came about during rescue excavations on Thames Water's sludge works.’
      • ‘Our excavation was a rescue project in every sense of the phrase.’
      • ‘By the late 1990s, the need for a more systematic programme of rescue archaeology had become urgent.’
      • ‘Here there is still a major task of rescue archaeology to be done, because the site is being rapidly eroded.’

Origin

Middle English from Old French rescoure from Latin re- (expressing intensive force) + excutere ‘shake out, discard’.