Definition of savage in English:

savage

Pronunciation /ˈsavij/ /ˈsævɪdʒ/

Translate savage into Spanish

adjective

  • 1(of an animal or force of nature) fierce, violent, and uncontrolled.

    • ‘packs of savage dogs roamed the streets’
    ferocious, fierce
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    1. 1.1Cruel and vicious; aggressively hostile.
      • ‘a savage attack on the government’
      vicious, brutal, cruel, sadistic, ferocious, fierce, violent, bloody, murderous, homicidal, bloodthirsty, bestial, brutish, barbaric, barbarous, merciless, ruthless, pitiless, heartless, inhuman, harsh, callous, cold-blooded
      fierce, blistering, scathing, searing, stinging, devastating, mordant, trenchant, caustic, cutting, biting, withering, virulent, vitriolic
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  • 2(of something bad or negative) very great; severe.

    • ‘the decision was a savage blow for the town’
    severe, crushing, devastating, crippling, terrible, awful, dreadful, dire, catastrophic, calamitous, ruinous
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  • 3dated, offensive (of a person or group) primitive and uncivilized.

    • ‘a savage race’
    primitive, uncivilized, unenlightened, non-literate, in a state of nature, heathen
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    1. 3.1(of a place) wild-looking and inhospitable; uncultivated.
      rugged, rough, wild, inhospitable, uninhabitable
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noun

  • 1A brutal or vicious person.

    • ‘the mother of one of the victims has described his assailants as savages’
    brute, beast, monster, barbarian, ogre, demon, sadist, animal
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  • 2dated, offensive A member of a people regarded as primitive and uncivilized.

    barbarian, wild man, wild woman, primitive, heathen
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  • 3Heraldry
    A representation of a bearded and semi-naked man with a wreath of leaves.

transitive verb

[with object]
  • 1(especially of a dog or wild animal) attack ferociously and maul.

    ‘ewes savaged by marauding dogs’
    • ‘If it's our ewe your dog is savaging that setout man may be saving you $125 and my wife's formidable wrath.’
    • ‘People are still savaged by dogs, but the topic is no longer fashionable.’
    • ‘Wilson tried to toss his coat over the dog to subdue it, but the dog savaged his hand and wrist until J.M. shot it.’
    • ‘The dog savaged the plaintiff when she entered the yard at night with her boyfriend who worked there.’
    • ‘Helen treats the fact that the bear has savaged her hands and reduced them to bleeding stumps as a minor inconvenience.’
    • ‘Nature's brutal and unforgiving approach is most evident when the orca whale savages a newly born grey whale and its mother, tearing away the whole baby's outer jaw in one swift motion.’
    • ‘Jebb - though not McLaren - also points to another grievance, in Aboriginal camp dogs, sometimes numbering thirty or more, savaging the stock.’
    • ‘In the meantime, the bear that savaged Mitch also makes a return and is taken into captivity, bringing back another ghost from Einar's past.’
    • ‘We'd have heard if people were being savaged by vulpine man-eaters.’
    • ‘The family's cat, she said, had savaged the bird, and one wing had been torn.’
    • ‘The lions chased him, and savaged his leg before he fell into a thorn bush too dense for them to reach him.’
    • ‘While still intact for the most part, the body has been chewed and savaged brutally.’
    • ‘There could be no liability for a dog known to be vicious until after it had managed to savage someone.’
    maul, attack, tear to pieces, lacerate, claw, bite, mutilate, mangle
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    1. 1.1Subject to a vicious verbal attack; criticize brutally.
      ‘Fowler savaged her in his next review’
      • ‘As Toronto theatre critics dispense increasingly disparate opinions, some shows are savaged in one rag and lionized in another.’
      • ‘Critics are savaging a government-funded course in Birmingham where grown-ups are being taught how to text and download ringtones.’
      • ‘Most critics savaged his comedy when it was released last fall, but really, what were they expecting?’
      • ‘The $10.5 million show, a haphazard pastiche of various famous Dr. Seuss stories, had been savaged by critics when it debuted in late November.’
      • ‘Marxist critics savaged La Strada as an abandonment of neorealist principles, but as a director, Fellini was never really a neorealist to begin with.’
      • ‘As predicted by many US pundits prior to its release, the film has been relentlessly savaged by the critics, and looks like a surefire contender for one of the worst movies of the year.’
      • ‘The book, influenced greatly by him, had largely been savaged by Australian critics and I wanted to see what he himself would make of it.’
      • ‘Critics are going to savage this film out of respect to Charade and that's not really fair.’
      • ‘Critics across the country savaged the film upon its initial release, dismissing it as directionless and dreary.’
      • ‘It hardly seems to matter that the critics have universally savaged this show.’
      • ‘Critics have, predictably, savaged the story, but everyone agrees the show is spectacular.’
      • ‘Perhaps no other great European choreographer, save Roland Petit, has been as neglected and critically savaged in the United States.’
      • ‘And the celebrity in question is violently torn down from their pedestal, savaged for as long as it pleases people, and finally cast aside, no longer of any use to anyone,’
      • ‘As someone who has written more than his share of omnibus reviews/poetry chronicles, especially for this magazine, I know the temptation reviewers are subject to by way of savaging thin volumes of verse.’
      • ‘Alexander fully expects to be savaged by reviewers again.’
      • ‘No one savaged the law's delays and inequities more energetically than Dickens, yet no one worried more about the results of revolution and lawlessness.’
      • ‘Pundits lost no time in savaging the weakness of the script, the poverty of the acting and shambolic directing.’
      • ‘I have had occasion over the years to savage this or that actor or screenwriter or director in print as part of my work as a film critic.’
      • ‘Rarely in the history of magazines has a former editor so savaged his successor.’
      • ‘Popular British and Australian historians have savaged the commanders at the Dardanelles as cold-blooded murderers.’
      criticize severely, attack, lambaste, condemn, flay, shoot down, pillory, revile
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Origin

Middle English from Old French sauvage ‘wild’, from Latin silvaticus ‘of the woods’, from silva ‘a wood’.