Main definitions of scot in English

: scot1Scot2

scot1

Translate scot into Spanish

noun

archaic
  • A payment corresponding to a modern tax, rate, or other assessed contribution.

    • ‘In fact, a scot or secot was a municipal tax in 12 th-century England and someone who went scot-free was one who succeeded in dodging the tax.’

Pronunciation

scot

/skät/ /skɑt/

Origin

Late Old English, from Old Norse skot ‘a shot’, reinforced by Old French escot, of Germanic origin; related to shot.

Main definitions of Scot in English

: scot1Scot2

Scot2

Translate Scot into Spanish

noun

  • 1A native of Scotland or a person of Scottish descent.

    ‘Although her art focuses on Scotland's industrial landscapes, Downie is not a native Scot.’
    • ‘This is the story of a young Scot of Pakistani descent and a young white woman of Irish descent.’
    • ‘As a Scot I welcome a Scottish Prime Minister, whichever side of the political equation.’
    • ‘Blues used in tartan cloth originally came from the native plant woad, which was also used as a form of ceremonial face and body paint by ancient Scots.’
    • ‘A battle between the English and the Scots in a North Yorkshire beauty spot is set to be commemorated by a stone cross.’
    • ‘In her heat, the Scot equalled her British record mark, winning in 25.07 seconds.’
    • ‘It argues that Hepburn was a proud Scot who was loyal to his Queen and fought for Scottish independence.’
    • ‘Above all, we need competition for places, if possible from native-born Scots.’
    • ‘On 22 July the English engaged the Scots under Wallace at Falkirk.’
    • ‘Yet Chinese body language, mannerisms and accents are about as similar to Japanese as Australians are to the Scots.’
    • ‘It would be hard to think of two European nations more dissimilar, historically, than the Italians and the Scots.’
    • ‘How much does an English international game matter to the Scots?’
    • ‘He fought for the armies of Russia, Poland and Sweden before joining the English in 1640 to fight the Scots.’
    • ‘I'm a Scot by birth living in Australia and writing about London detectives.’
    • ‘Later interviewed on holiday in Scotland, he had been offered hospitality by a Scot.’
    • ‘The young Scot was ostracised by the Italian manager and cut adrift by his club.’
    • ‘The Scot had moved to the US with his American father in 1992 after his parents divorced.’
    • ‘The popular Scot has the honour and responsibility of captaining the European team.’
    • ‘Both candidates are Scots, and have no hope of concealing the fact from the English electorate on whose votes they would rely at the General Election.’
    • ‘Single malt whisky was considered too heavy by the Scots, so by blending malt and grain whiskies Walker created a smoother drink.’
    1. 1.1A member of a Gaelic people that migrated from Ireland to Scotland around the late 5th century.
      ‘It might be supposed, therefore, that the position of mormaer was a creation of the new Gaelic kingdom of the Scots.’
      • ‘The non-English parts of the UK have ten million Gaels, Celts, Picts, Irish, Scots and Vikings.’
      • ‘In 367, the Scots and Picts ignored agreements made with Rome and attacked the frontier.’
      • ‘King Angus MacFergus of the Picts commanded a mixed army of Scots and Picts who were fighting an army of Saxons from Northumbria.’
      • ‘Ancient Scots and Picts erected a 10 ft tall standing stone at the site to commemorate the historic act.’

Pronunciation

Scot

/skät/ /skɑt/

Usage

On the different uses of Scot, Scots, Scottish, and Scotch, see Scottish

Origin

Old English Scottas (plural), from late Latin Scottus, of unknown ultimate origin.