Main definitions of sere in English

: sere1sere2

sere1

(also sear)

Pronunciation /sir/ /sɪr/

adjective

literary
  • (especially of vegetation) dry or withered.

    ‘small green vineyards encircled by vast sear fields’
    • ‘Storm clouds pile up above the sere plain, and in the foreground, a granite marker is etched with a mountain range, two pines and the words ‘Traveling Wolf, born 1878, died 1961.’’
    • ‘In Morocco, on a pinchpenny budget of $6 million, Scorsese recreated a Palestine of sere deserts and balding meadows.’
    • ‘Twice divorced, he lives alone in an Italian-style estate near the sere hills of north Phoenix, where he is surrounded by citrus and pecan trees and paintings by Andy Warhol.’
    • ‘I roll down the dusty window to let the afternoon heat pour in and to better watch the sere coast fall away as I slowly angle up the rugged flank of Haleakala, eventually looping back to Kahului.’
    • ‘The homunculus stares solemnly at my sere soil.’
    • ‘Just beyond the southern boundary of the reserve lies Russia's republic of Tuva, a sere land of yaks and camels tended by seminomadic herders.’
    • ‘The only green that remained was the spreading, tired, dark foliage of the occasional live oak tree standing sentinel in sere pastureland.’
    • ‘I don't think we've had a real frost yet, though we've lagged delicate things such as the tree fern in readiness for the sere times to come.’
    • ‘Daily we drove over sere gulches our guide referred to as rivers.’
    • ‘For two afternoons a week, for the two summer school terms, for four years, I was made to stand in the middle of a featureless paddock in the middle of this sere landscape, doing nothing except seething with a mixture of boredom and anger.’
    • ‘Climates and soils vary as dramatically as landscapes: mountains rear out of the sea, unfolding into lush valleys, sere drylands, and a series of inland mountain chains.’
    • ‘The high pastureland was lush with grass, sere and tussocky now after the summer's heat, and it sort of rolled, building itself up in a series of slow waves into the foothills of the Sierras.’
    • ‘But when he first arrived five years ago, the surrounding hills were as sere and brown as everywhere else.’
    • ‘But these seeds, collected over generations, were the germ of crops that were especially adapted to thrive in the sere, rocky croplands of Afghanistan.’
    • ‘What solitary distances, what sere, remote escarpments, what unbounded, wide eternities they are where you reside, in which no creatures of your hand appear!’

Origin

Old English sēar see sear.

Main definitions of sere in English

: sere1sere2

sere2

Pronunciation /sir/ /sɪr/

noun

Ecology
  • A natural succession of plant (or animal) communities, especially a full series from uncolonized habitat to the appropriate climax vegetation.

    Compare with succession

    ‘Although herbivory tends to hasten succession from shrubs and pioneer trees to forest, it typically retards succession from earlier seres.’
    • ‘On well-drained sites, shrub seres are rare and graminoid-forb mixtures are often replaced directly by northern hardwood tree species.’

Origin

Early 20th century from Latin serere ‘join in a series’.