Definition of skint in English:

skint

adjective

British informal
  • (of a person) having little or no money available.

    ‘I'm a bit skint just now’
    • ‘You have a lot of money in October, then come March you're skint again.’
    • ‘Whenever you go to the council asking for new books and equipment they say they are skint but they can find money for this kind of thing.’
    • ‘Being students, we were always skint and wanted the easiest, most flexible, and most profitable form of income we could get.’
    • ‘Laura, currently on placement at Salford's Hope Hospital, said: ‘I'm a skint student.’’
    • ‘I was so skint I couldn't even get the kids anything for Christmas.’
    • ‘‘I wasn't going to play this season because I was skint,’ said Shaw.’
    • ‘And he doesn't mind taking on the job when I'm skint.’
    • ‘‘He knew I was skint, so he asked if I wanted to come and work in this place for eight hours a day,’ recalls Hemphill.’
    • ‘And what about women who can't afford to pay and have low pain thresholds - do they just lie there screaming in agony because they are skint?’
    • ‘With lager prices having risen 160% in 10 years, is it any wonder they're skint?’
    • ‘By that, I mean we were too skint to really do anything.’
    • ‘‘We were always skint before,’ Rowley says of the days before the band got signed.’
    • ‘Some suggest that Jackson is so skint that last year he was forced to cough up a $2 million diamond watch as collateral for a bank loan.’
    • ‘I had previously owned a mustard-coloured Maxi and hated it, but I was so skint I found myself buying another one.’
    • ‘We have had a very bad election result, we are effectively skint, our activists are discouraged and our membership is falling.’
    • ‘But loads of skint people from the estates around here use it, and it's creaming off cash from them.’
    • ‘Due to reckless recent shiny gadget business acquisitions, I'm completely skint.’
    • ‘After years spent as a skint student with only a few pounds to my name, I learnt to sniff out the best deals behind the bar.’
    • ‘But the worst time to be on Oxford Street is when you are skint and are shopping for someone else.’
    • ‘A thief had to empty his pockets out in the court dock to prove he was skint.’
    destitute, poverty-stricken, impoverished, indigent, penniless, insolvent, impecunious, ruined, pauperized, without a penny to one's name, without two farthings to rub together, without two pennies to rub together

Origin

1920s variant of colloquial skinned, in the same sense, past participle of skin.

Pronunciation

skint

/skɪnt/