Definition of skunk in English:

skunk

Translate skunk into Spanish

noun

  • 1A cat-sized American mammal of the weasel family, with distinctive black-and-white striped fur. When threatened it squirts a fine spray of foul-smelling irritant liquid from its anal glands towards its attacker.

    Mephitis and other genera, family Mustelidae: several species, in particular the striped skunk (M. mephitis)

    1. 1.1The fur of the skunk.
  • 2 informal, derogatory A contemptible person.

    • ‘he'd run up a massive phone bill and hadn't paid—the skunk’
    scoundrel, villain, rogue, rascal, brute, animal, weasel, snake, monster, ogre, wretch, devil, good-for-nothing, reprobate, wrongdoer, evil-doer
  • 3 informal

    short for "skunkweed"

Pronunciation

skunk

/skəNGk/ /skəŋk/

transitive verb

[with object]North American
  • 1 informal Defeat (someone) overwhelmingly in a game or contest, especially by preventing them from scoring at all.

    • ‘I knew he was a good fisherman, but I didn't expect him to skunk you’
    • ‘After that, we went to play a round of pool so that I could redeem myself, and we both thought for a bit that I was going to skunk him.’
    • ‘Been skunked a few times this year, even though you used your favorite rod, went to your super-secret spot and wore your lucky underwear?’
    • ‘If weather skunked our 14-day road trip, we would at least hit the most spectacular ski area in Canada.’
    • ‘Just as Lola was about to skunk Sherice with her peg points the doorbell rang.’
    • ‘We don't always get skunked on these expeditions.’
    • ‘When I got to the gate I found all of the outlets already in use - skunked again!’
    defeat, beat, best, get the better of, gain the advantage over, prevail over, triumph over, gain a victory over, trounce, rout, thrash, drub, vanquish, conquer, master, overcome, overwhelm, overpower, overthrow, crush, subdue, subjugate
  • 2 informal, dated Fail to pay (a bill or creditor)

    • ‘he made a practice of skunking hotels’

Pronunciation

skunk

/skəNGk/ /skəŋk/

Origin

Mid 17th century from Abnaki segankw; variants occur in many other North American Indian dialects.