Definition of strangulate in English:

strangulate

Pronunciation /ˈstraNGɡyəˌlāt/ /ˈstræŋɡjəˌleɪt/

Translate strangulate into Spanish

transitive verb

[with object]
  • 1Indian Strangle; throttle.

    ‘the victim had been strangulated’
    • ‘In the more humane 19th cent., however, the sight of poor folk being strangulated for minor offences became less acceptable, and other methods of crime prevention were sought.’
    • ‘Mr Surjewala said the government had strangulated the democracy in Haryana by registering false criminal cases against Congress leaders and workers.’
    • ‘Using strangulated syntax instead of plain English means that the real meaning can be concealed from all save the magic circle of fellow-professionals who are in on the act.’
    • ‘As a consequence, the city is reduced to humdrum of brick and mortar breeding environmental and health hazards while strangulating human existence.’
    • ‘Indian fashion is at a different stage of development and just arbitrarily dumping foreign trends into clothes stores strangulates Indian tastes and style.’
    • ‘The minorities, especially the ten million Christians, are physically, socially and spiritually strangulated and trapped under the Blasphemy Law in Pakistan.’
    • ‘In the 1990s and beyond, institutions of higher education in Africa, especially the universities, must contend with several interrelated major problems, whose combined effect threatens to strangulate them…’
    • ‘As the project is executed with aid from the World Bank, there may be several strings attached that may eventually strangulate the unsuspecting customers whose immediate need is water.’
    • ‘All of a sudden - when the working classes benefit - we get a massed chorus warning of money's strangulating effect.’
    • ‘He has beaten up his mother and children and even tried to strangulate one child.’
    • ‘The Government has decided to legislate, regulate and, as usual, strangulate.’
    • ‘He came up with the scheme in response to strangulating trading blocks imposed by England, which had led to widespread poverty in Scotland.’
    • ‘The car's waist got higher and fatter and the engine became increasingly strangulated by anti-emissions equipment as the years rolled by.’
    • ‘This absorbs the human resources of the police and reduces their ability to strangulate the supply route.’
    • ‘But the law is free of that strangulating formalism that is seen as a burden rather than a blessing.’
    throttle, choke, garrotte
    1. 1.1Hamper or hinder the development or activity of.
      • ‘dynastic politics is strangulating democracy’

Origin

Mid 17th century (in the sense ‘suffocate’): from Latin strangulat- ‘choked’, from the verb strangulare (see strangle).