Definition of Trappist in English:

Trappist

Pronunciation /ˈtrapəst/ /ˈtræpəst/

Translate Trappist into Spanish

adjective

  • Relating to a branch of the Cistercian order of monks founded in 1664 and noted for an austere rule that includes remaining silent for much of the time.

    ‘The first Trappist monks arrived in Algeria in the nineteenth century in the wake of the French colonial army that took Algiers from the Barbary pirates in 1830.’
    • ‘And I know that a year, two years, or even a lifetime as a Trappist monk would not have ‘worked’ either.’
    • ‘He went as far as visiting Gethsemani Abbey in Kentucky, where the Trappist monk and author Thomas Merton lived, in 1966.’
    • ‘He spent some time as a Trappist monk, then moved to Nazareth.’
    • ‘Merton, as a Trappist monk, wrote openly of his continuing difficulties with Abbot James at Gethsemani, even of falling in love with a nurse in Louisville.’
    • ‘This is a weird multi-threaded story in which physicists at the Vatican conduct experiments that may have turned a Trappist monk into the reincarnation of God.’
    • ‘However, the truth that Boris is struggling to hide will eventually come between them and threaten their love for each other - because Boris is a Trappist monk who has run away from his monastery and abandoned his calling.’
    • ‘‘If you're a Trappist monk and you oppose partnership they won't bother you, but if you shout it from the rooftops, you're marked,’ said one trade unionist.’
    • ‘How much would the detailed study of a serial killer or a Trappist monk reveal about typical human behaviour?’
    • ‘In the postwar years, there had been a tremendous surge in Trappist vocations among returning veterans and others, inspired largely by the popularity of Thomas Merton's Seven Storey Mountain.’
    • ‘The young monk in the gift shop helped me pick it out, along with a couple of books by Thomas Merton and a loaf of brown Trappist bread.’
    • ‘On their Yaak hike, though, I picture the laughter vaporizing and the good monk freezing in his tracks as the landscape itself suddenly raises the question: what Trappist cedars?’
    • ‘The strictness of the Trappist order has contributed to the maintenance of their brewing tradition - any Trappist beer is guaranteed to be well-crafted, pure and steeped in history.’
    • ‘Of less renown are the ales of Wallonia's other Trappist breweries, Orval and Rochefort, the latter's being the most rare of the Wallonian Trappists.’
    • ‘Their demigod status comes from being the first guys to bring Trappist ales to Philly and the first to put Chimay on permanent tap anywhere outside Belgium.’
    • ‘The best known are Trappist ales from Belgian monasteries.’
    • ‘I want to free the word contemplative from its captivity in Buddhist and Trappist monasteries and reclaim it for people like ourselves.’
    • ‘I also made the mistake of trying a malty Belgian Trappist beer that was 11% alcohol.’
    • ‘Father Behrens was a diocesan priest in Newark, New Jersey, prior to his decision to enter the Trappist monastery in Conyers, Georgia, where he now lives and writes.’
    • ‘His lovely book tells the tale of Brother Antoine, a young Canadian who enters a Trappist monastery in the 1970s to the dismay of his family.’

noun

  • A member of the Trappist order.

    ‘That meeting came about during a retreat in Spencer, Massachusetts, at Saint Joseph's Abbey, a monastery operated by the Cistercian Order of the Strict Observance, commonly known as the Trappists.’
    • ‘Just less than two weeks before his decisive return to Kentucky he writes in his journal: ‘(the idea of) going to the Trappists is exciting, it fills me with awe and desire.’’
    • ‘Three of the Trappists went back to France, at least temporarily-one who needed treatment for his heart condition; one whose mother was sick; and one novice, still undecided about his vocation, who left to finish his studies.’
    • ‘In late 1993, a group of French Trappists living in Algeria rethought and then reaffirmed their decision to maintain their presence in the country.’
    • ‘On my first attempt to spend time with the Trappists at Spencer, I was unable to get a room at the abbey, so I stayed at Mary House, about a mile away.’
    • ‘He also taught in Latin America and went on an extended retreat with the Trappists.’
    • ‘In a remarkable way, the Trappists ' desire to remain as a peaceful presence of the church in Algeria extended even to the extremists who threatened their lives.’
    • ‘One thinks in this connection of the Cistercians and Trappists as reformed branches of the Benedictine order, and of the Discalced Carmelites, who conducted a thoroughgoing reform of their order in sixteenth-century Spain.’
    • ‘His reflections on daily life with the Trappists are funny, wise, and often profound - resembling Kathleen Norris's The Cloister Walk, but a bit less thematically structured and more down to earth.’
    • ‘Of less renown are the ales of Wallonia's other Trappist breweries, Orval and Rochefort, the latter's being the most rare of the Wallonian Trappists.’
    • ‘The Trappists appealed to a form of self-abnegation that appears regularly in the history of Catholic spirituality.’
    • ‘Finding even the rule of the Trappists too comfortable, he set himself up in a tiny stone cell in the Sahara.’
    • ‘He became a Trappist, sent to make a novitiate near Syria.’
    • ‘I am not an angel, a Trappist or a lily of the field.’
    • ‘I am not a Trappist but what I have learned from him has been tremendously valuable to my life.’

Origin

Early 19th century from French trappiste, from La Trappe in Normandy.