Definition of traumatic in English:

traumatic

Pronunciation /trəˈmadik/ /trəˈmædɪk/ /trouˈmadik/ /traʊˈmædɪk/ /trôˈmadik/ /trɔˈmædɪk/

Translate traumatic into Spanish

adjective

  • 1Emotionally disturbing or distressing.

    ‘she was going through a traumatic divorce’
    • ‘It was a traumatic episode with a distressing cliffhanger.’
    • ‘It was a deeply traumatic experience anticipating a police dog going berserk in the enclosed space that is Streatham Hill ticket office.’
    • ‘His lack of health was incredibly disturbing and traumatic for all of us, especially a young boy who idolised him.’
    • ‘For families of victims it is also deeply traumatic watching their loved ones struggle for breath.’
    • ‘Divorce is traumatic enough without having to wait two years to get your case heard and sort out your life in a courthouse hall.’
    • ‘Stop reading books about making things work with your wife and read a few about how to make the divorce less traumatic for them.’
    • ‘Separation and divorce are traumatic experiences for couples, their children and their extended families.’
    • ‘Let me tell you that throat cancer is not a pretty or a dignified way to go: it is humiliating and painful and traumatic for their families who are left to pick up the pieces.’
    • ‘His daughter, now a healthy toddler, had open-heart surgery when she was a few weeks old, a time he remembers as traumatic and upsetting.’
    • ‘It was the the most painful and traumatic thing I have ever experienced but I am glad I decided to wait it out and see if I could do it naturally.’
    • ‘And while the trend in the county was less devastating it was nonetheless traumatic.’
    • ‘We can only imagine this was indeed a most traumatic and horrifying discovery for the boy.’
    • ‘While still agonizing over this traumatic separation, he is approached by a white man who offers him a picayune.’
    • ‘For many, the most traumatic and painful part of the disorder is the constant obsession with food and weight.’
    • ‘The loss of innocence is not only inevitable, but it is also both traumatic and devastating.’
    • ‘Kids who have gone through a traumatic divorce or the loss of a loved one may already be emotionally at risk.’
    • ‘It's as painful and traumatic as having a metal probe stuck under your fingernail to pull if off.’
    • ‘This is going to be traumatic and painful and I want to shield myself from it as much as possible.’
    • ‘In Miller's case, the event was particularly traumatic, an awful bolt from the blue.’
    • ‘These are people that are next to you in a traumatic incident and that trust and support and respect has to be there.’
    disturbing, shocking, distressing, disquieting, upsetting, damaging, scarring, injurious, harmful, hurtful, painful, agonizing, awful, chilling, alarming, devastating, harrowing, excruciating, horrifying, terrifying
    stressful, demanding, trying, taxing, terrible, bad, unpleasant, disagreeable, irksome, troublesome, vexatious
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Relating to or causing psychological trauma.
      ‘Psychological reactions to traumatic events also affect sexual functioning.’
      • ‘Since the traumatic incident was, by definition, unpleasant, its repetition appeared to contravene the pleasure principle.’
      • ‘In addition, amnesia for traumatic events may occur in rare cases.’
      • ‘Finally, traumatic stress seems to have had an impact on the prevalence of general psychopathology as well.’
      • ‘In fact, PTSD can occur in individuals who have been exposed indirectly to a traumatic stressor.’
    2. 1.2Medicine Relating to or denoting physical injury.
      ‘Researchers know that one common thread in a body's reaction to a traumatic injury is inflammation.’
      • ‘All pregnant women with traumatic injury should be assessed formally in a medical setting.’
      • ‘This is the cause of chronic swelling that sometimes occurs after surgery or a traumatic injury to a limb.’
      • ‘We also asked the nurse to name one ward providing observation for patients with traumatic brain injuries, where we repeated the interview.’
      • ‘About 600-700 people sustain acute traumatic injuries to the spinal cord in the United Kingdom each year.’

Origin

Mid 19th century via late Latin from Greek traumatikos, from trauma (see trauma).