Main definitions of twit in English

: twit1twit2twit3

twit1

Pronunciation /twit/ /twɪt/

noun

informal British
  • A silly or foolish person.

    • ‘Both camps, according to White House insiders, are silly twits.’
    • ‘He thought of them as the lowest of low in the class known as CTJN class, the ‘creeps, twits, jerks and nerds’ class.’
    • ‘While I'd seen my fair share of mediocre upper middle-class twits leapfrog their contemporaries, I really believed that the results-driven media game was largely a meritocracy.’
    • ‘But some of her descendants behave unacceptably, like the worst kind of upper class twits.’
    • ‘I'm sure we can imagine the scene a hundred years on: ‘Yes, it used to be a nice old 16th century church but the insides were ripped out by some twits in 2004’.’
    • ‘Three days after the Prime Minister's petulant sneer that only reactionary twits claim education standards have fallen comes pretty devastating evidence that this is indeed the case.’
    • ‘Can you imagine seeing that familiar bunch of florid-faced twits gathering outside a rural bus operator's office to protest about the cut in regular services?’
    • ‘And these twits think that it's heresy to be in favour of the free market or against the UN.’
    • ‘The tragedy is that statisticians and pollsters take these pathetic twits seriously.’
    • ‘He seems to know his job rather more thoroughly than the dumb twits who've been along so far.’
    • ‘Now most of them look like hippies gone wrong or aged twits clinging to their youth.’
    • ‘I admit as well that I hate bureaucratically obsessed twits.’
    • ‘How can we, in Britain, refer to ourselves as a democracy, when we still allow a bunch of upper-class twits to rule the roost?’
    • ‘None of these twits have done anything that they claimed they would do.’
    • ‘In the good old days these guys would have been turned into a Monty Python skit about twits on parade.’
    • ‘So, don't dismiss tennis as a sport for hot Russian babes and upper-class twits only.’
    • ‘These twits have had an unchallenged run in the media for far too long already.’
    • ‘There is no way I could have watched those two twits - talk about strange bedfellows, by the way - without heaving a brick through the TV set.’
    • ‘The interviewer and the audience, if sincere, are twits.’
    • ‘Now I've met enough pompous twits in my time to know one when I hear one.’
    fool, idiot, ass, halfwit, nincompoop, blockhead, buffoon, dunce, dolt, ignoramus, cretin, imbecile, dullard, moron, simpleton, clod
    View synonyms

Origin

1930s (earlier dialect, in the sense ‘talebearer’): perhaps from twit.

Pronunciation

twit

/twit/ /twɪt/

Main definitions of twit in English

: twit1twit2twit3

twit2

Pronunciation /twit/ /twɪt/

transitive verbtwits, twitting, twitted

[with object]informal, dated
  • Tease or taunt (someone), especially in a good-humored way.

    ‘her playmates could not twit her about her pigtail’
    • ‘This was young Gene Siskel, twitting his rival, later partner-rival, Ebert.’
    • ‘I twitted Don gently because both Denise and Robert had some harsh words for him in their letters.’
    • ‘Later on, when NR twitted feminists for supporting a later president, Bill Clinton, I got a note from Dworkin pointing out that she didn't.’
    • ‘I've never before seen an Elektra show a sense of humor - her giddy twitting and teasing of Aegisth as she leads him to his bloody doom is positively hilarious.’
    • ‘He maintained that an occasional prank was essential to the spirit of journalism, earning a reputation for twitting colleagues and candidates alike.’

Origin

Old English ætwītan ‘reproach with’, from æt ‘at’ + wītan ‘to blame’.

Pronunciation

twit

/twit/ /twɪt/

Main definitions of twit in English

: twit1twit2twit3

twit3

Pronunciation /twit/ /twɪt/

noun

informal
  • A state of agitation or nervous excitement.

    ‘we're in a twit about your visit’

Origin

Probably from twitter.

Pronunciation

twit

/twit/ /twɪt/