Main definitions of weave in English

: weave1weave2

weave1

Pronunciation /wēv/ /wiv/

See synonyms for weave

Translate weave into Spanish

transitive verbwove, woven

[with object]
  • 1Form (fabric or a fabric item) by interlacing long threads passing in one direction with others at a right angle to them.

    ‘textiles woven from linen or wool’
    • ‘woven shawls’
    entwine, lace, work, twist, knit, interlace, intertwine, interwork, intertwist, interknit, twist together, criss-cross, braid, twine, plait
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    1. 1.1Interlace (threads) so as to form fabric.
      • ‘some thick mohairs can be difficult to weave’
  • 2Make (a complex story or pattern) from a number of interconnected elements.

    • ‘he weaves colourful, cinematic plots’
    invent, make up, fabricate, put together, construct, create, contrive, spin
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1weave something intoInclude an element in (a story or pattern)
      • ‘interpretative comments are woven into the narrative’

noun

  • 1usually with adjective A particular style or manner in which something is woven.

    ‘scarlet cloth of a very fine weave’
    • ‘Now, though all the traditional weaves, styles and colour are there, we have to take them forward.’
    • ‘There are roses, leopards and paisleys, reds, golds and indigos, fine weaves and coarse weaves.’
    • ‘It appeared to have one more cloth under the heavier top cloth of thick high-quality fine weave, but was smooth and slippery like silk.’
    • ‘The trailing veil brushed an ember, the material curling and shrinking as orange sparks raced up its fine weave.’
    • ‘Beneath it lay more men's clothes, including linen tunics of fine weave and workmanship.’
    • ‘There were different weaves in jute and blends of jute with cotton and silk.’
    • ‘The screen was woollen, an open weave to let the sound through from behind, with darned patches, brighter than the yellowed screen.’
    • ‘History does not record stitched garments till a fairly late date but garments made from fine cloth, with intricate weaves and designs, were very much part of ancient India.’
    • ‘To minimize staining and wear and tear, Carmichael chooses cottons with a tight weave and a pattern.’
    • ‘Traditional basketry involves great care and pride, the weaver showcasing his skill through intricate weaves, designs, and colours.’
    • ‘If the basket has an open weave at the upper edge, a ribbon or fabric tie can be woven through the wicker.’
    • ‘Look for wool or acrylic knit hats with a tight, thick weave.’
    • ‘Brocade is a jacquard weave with an embossed effect and contrasting surfaces.’
    • ‘Many different patterns are possible, producing different kinds of textile and styles of weave.’
    • ‘We have tried to create textures that would give a look of the beautiful weave used in Central Asian carpets.’
    • ‘Spaces recurring at regular intervals but shifting to the right on each subsequent line create an intricate, jacquardlike weave.’
    • ‘It is in that episode that the larger implications of Schreiner's intricate weave of fiction and autobiography become apparent.’
    • ‘Gregor Jordan's Ned Kelly is a glorious film, beautifully photographed against the Australian landscape, a brilliant weave of fact and fantasy.’
    • ‘It can be a delicate weave or one that is more basic, heavy, or plain.’
    • ‘Moya's book is a masterful weave of empirical study and analytical insights.’
  • 2A hairstyle created by weaving pieces of real or artificial hair into a person's existing hair, typically in order to increase its length or thickness.

    ‘trailers show him with dyed blond hair and, in one scene, a flowing blond weave’
    • ‘Well, I don't have a weave.’
    • ‘Don't weigh down a weave with heavy products like gels or moisturizing lotions, or by adding too much hair.’
    • ‘It's not just black women who love to wear a weave.’
    • ‘To avoid a weave that looks like a wig, take care not to add too much hair.’
    • ‘You can have any color with a weave.’
    • ‘I'd be disappointed too if I had a weave that blatantly fake.’
    • ‘Who has the patience to get a weave?’
    • ‘Her blonde weave, plucked and meticulously painted eyebrows, bandana, kitschy makeup, and attitude exude hip-hop's aesthetic.’
    • ‘When the hairstylists showed up to do all the girls' hair they removed her weave and left her hair in this afro-ish, puffy look.’
    • ‘Put a bad weave on me, slap me in some bedazzled panties that are three sizes too small, and I could probably wander around and forget how to lip-sync, too.’

Origin

Old English wefan, of Germanic origin, from an Indo-European root shared by Greek huphē ‘web’ and Sanskrit ūrṇavābhi ‘spider’, literally ‘wool-weaver’. The current noun sense dates from the late 19th century.

Main definitions of weave in English

: weave1weave2

weave2

Pronunciation /wēv/ /wiv/

See synonyms for weave

Translate weave into Spanish

intransitive verb

[no object]
  • 1Twist and turn from side to side while moving somewhere in order to avoid obstructions.

    ‘he had to weave his way through the crowds’
    • ‘During this he drove through red traffic lights, forced other vehicles to brake to avoid collisions, weaved in and out of traffic, and reached 85 mph.’
    • ‘Cars swerved this way and that to avoid them as they weaved in and around the traffic.’
    • ‘Horns blare as cars weave to avoid horse-drawn carts.’
    • ‘The cabbie often harbours the misconception that he is a racing driver and your heart will be in your mouth as you see him weave and twist in the traffic.’
    • ‘On the night of the rally, we walked with the crowd for nearly an hour, bobbing and weaving to avoid the umbrellas.’
    • ‘Then Mary started to throw things and he had to duck and weave to avoid the homemade missiles.’
    • ‘We weaved back and forth across the road to avoid the largest of the potholes, dodging trucks and motorbikes and cows along the way.’
    • ‘Everyone is weaving all over the road to avoid the deep holes.’
    • ‘His car rumbled through dense vegetation and weaved back and forth to avoid trees.’
    • ‘Several witnesses observed a driver in a 1993 Chevrolet Cavalier speeding and weaving in and out of traffic while northbound on PR 216.’
    • ‘Witnesses described how the two men were driving ‘like madmen’, weaving in and out of traffic, cutting in front of buses, and speeding around roundabouts.’
    • ‘Butler was weaving through the traffic, trying to get as close as possible.’
    • ‘The four weaved through the trees, heading for the western edge of the forest.’
    • ‘She sighed and looked over at him before weaving back through the trees.’
    • ‘She carefully weaved her way through the crowd of students making for the exit.’
    • ‘After weaving between a few trees, the vehicle climbs a subtle dune and stops.’
    • ‘They started down the crowded hallway, weaving around slower moving crowds.’
    • ‘She waved at him over her shoulder before they followed the young man through the streets, desperately trying not to lose sight of him while weaving in and out of the rowdy crowd.’
    • ‘Fast-paced dance music was playing, and people were either dancing like crazy, making out or weaving through the crowds looking for their dates.’
    • ‘I wondered about a lot of things as I weaved through the few remaining cars to mine.’
    • ‘She easily weaved around the few cars which were on the road.’
    • ‘The girl weaved through the throng of people to stumble into the nearest tent.’
    • ‘While the convoy weaved its way through the narrow streets of a small town, an improvised explosive devise exploded.’
    thread, thread one's way, wind, wind one's way, work, work one's way, dodge, move in and out, swerve, zigzag, criss-cross
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1Take evasive action in an aircraft, typically by moving it from side to side.
      ‘We just put the nose down and went weaving and skidding in a dive, passing over the breakwater of Cherbourg at about 400 feet.’
      • ‘Radar controls fired their guns, and if we didn't turn constantly, weaving about, we'd be shot down within a minute or less.’
      • ‘If you miss him coming in, you can shoot him as he recovers from his attack if you keep weaving.’
      • ‘As I attack, I weave from side to side, occasionally looping around the gunship I'm currently firing at.’
      • ‘RAF planes which return to Britain to refuel take off again and weave through the flak above Dieppe ‘pasting enemy airfields.’’
      • ‘Fighters were weaving in and out, some exploding in tiny flashes of light.’
      • ‘Gritting his teeth and squinting with determination he pursued the enemy fighter that weaved in and out of his sights but he stayed with it.’
      • ‘The fighters weave around one another in an impressive display of aerodynamic acrobatics in space.’
      • ‘Ducking, spinning, banking and weaving, they were putting up a splendid bulletless dogfight.’
      • ‘Max was in a dogfight, he saw, weaving around a rapidly moving enemy.’
      • ‘As we weaved through the screen of helicopter gunships on our final approach, I turned to Adrian, smiling the smile of a very happy man, and couldn't believe what I saw.’
      • ‘The orange and white striped jet fighters would weave in and out of formations with skill akin to that of ballet dancers.’
    2. 1.2(of a horse) repeatedly swing the head and forepart of the body from side to side (considered to be a vice).
      ‘Special grilles can be put over the stable door to restrict the movement of the head and neck when the horse is standing with his head over the stable door, but some horses weave inside the stable.’
      • ‘When a horse weaves he is basically walking in place, swaying his front and neck from side to side repetitively.’
      • ‘Of course she used to pace up and down the paddocks when she was turned out, too, but she didn't weave in the field.’

Origin

Late 16th century probably from Old Norse veifa ‘to wave, brandish’.