Definition of woke in English:

woke

Translate woke into Spanish

verb

past of wake

Pronunciation

woke

/wōk/ /woʊk/

adjectiveadjective woker, adjective wokest

informal
  • Alert to injustice and discrimination in society, especially racism.

    • ‘we need to stay angry, and stay woke’
    • ‘does being woke mean I have to agree with what all other woke folks say should be done about issues in the black community?’
    • ‘the West Coast has the wokest dudes’
    • ‘Woke black girls are the microcosm who are advocating for the majority, taking a stand on issues that are impacting our community.’
    • ‘That disappointment when you thought he was woke, but his homophobia, misogyny and racism starts to show.’
    • ‘Engaging in conversations with woke folks always teaches me a thing or two about social justice and equality, and sometimes I’ll walk away with a good book recommendation too.’
    • ‘That woke guy uses his celebrity influence to raise awareness around injustice and inequality.’
    • ‘Jesse’s so woke that he candidly addresses his light-skinned, blue-eyed privilege.’
    • ‘Those who are woke must engage themselves in ways that actively challenge the world we live in.’
    • ‘Stay woke, stay vigilant and stay engaged.’
    • ‘One needn’t look far for proof of her woke credibility—she has long been a vocal feminist and supporter of LGBTQ rights, among other things.’
    • ‘The magazine honored 100 woke women in their May issue.’
    • ‘I stress the urgent need to get woke, stay woke and better the state of black lives.’
    revolutionary, progressive, reforming, reformist, progressivist, revisionist

    Origin

    1960s originally in African American usage.

Pronunciation

woke

/wōk/ /woʊk/