Definition of wood in English:

wood

See synonyms for wood

Translate wood into Spanish

noun

  • 1The hard fibrous material that forms the main substance of the trunk or branches of a tree or shrub, used for fuel or timber.

    ‘a block of wood’
    • ‘best quality woods were used for joinery’
    timber, planks, planking
    firewood, kindling, logs
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1the woodWooden barrels used for storing alcoholic drinks.
      • ‘wines from the wood’
    2. 1.2A golf club with a wooden or other head that is relatively broad from face to back (often with a numeral indicating the degree to which the face is angled to loft the ball)
      • ‘he hit the ball with a three-wood’
    3. 1.3Golf A shot made with a wood.
      • ‘he's hitting a wood for his second shot’
  • 2

    (also woods)
    An area of land, smaller than a forest, that is covered with growing trees.

    ‘a thick hedge divided the wood from the field’
    • ‘a long walk in the woods’
    forest, woodland, trees
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

wood

/wo͝od/ /wʊd/

Phrases

    get wood
    US vulgar slang
    • Have an erection.

    knock on wood
    North American
    • Said after a confident or positive statement, to express a hope for one's good luck to continue.

      ‘I haven't been banned yet, knock on wood’
      • ‘So far we have only had one trip to York District Hospital (fingers crossed, touch wood and spit for luck) after he ran head first into the fireplace and got a bruised lump roughly the size of a pickled egg on his noggin.’
      • ‘He would throw salt over his shoulder and knock on wood just for good luck, I didn't learn this until I lived with him.’
      • ‘I used direct deposit, it hasn't been a problem as of yet, knock on wood.’
      • ‘We haven't had a fatal accident in the village yet, touch wood, but we don't want to sit back and wait for that to happen.’
      • ‘This hasn't happened to me yet, touch wood, but you have only to approach a speed camera on a free-flowing road to realise that it must happen fairly often.’
      • ‘And so hopefully, you know, knock on wood, we'll get to do a second season, and that will be one for next year.’
      • ‘I did have to call a moratorium on all the email I'd accumulated but I think (fingers crossed, touch wood, any other superstitious luck gatherer you can think of) that I'm just about sorted.’
      • ‘On the other hand people still avoid walking under ladders and knock on wood and cross their fingers in order to guard there luck.’
      • ‘So at the moment, touch wood, we have not got reports of epidemics, but it would be foolish for us to assume that we're through the worst.’
      • ‘Although, knock on wood, I have never fallen victim to this affliction, I can think of few things scarier, and I very well may have a rush of fear like the one I'm experiencing right now this time every winter for the rest of my life.’

      Origin

      With reference to the custom of touching something wooden to ward off bad luck.

    out of the woods
    • usually with negative Out of danger or difficulty.

      ‘we are not out of the woods but we have been thrown a lifeline’
      • ‘Observers, however, do not doubt that the company is well down the recovery track - if not quite out of the woods.’
      • ‘Neither he nor his illustrious brother seem out of the woods yet.’
      • ‘Her doctor said, Yes, she's out of the woods, with a quickening and lightening of his voice.’
      • ‘Johnville will know as well as anyone that they are not out of the woods as yet, despite their gallant showing in Tramore last week.’
      • ‘But the club is not out of the woods yet - despite a deal being done to keep the Bantams playing at Valley Parade next season.’
      • ‘‘I would just say that we are not out of the woods on that yet either,’ he claimed.’
      • ‘But the polls show that McConnell is far from being out of the woods.’
      • ‘I think we're just about out of the woods on this whole New Year's thing.’
      • ‘So I have a feeling that it's not reasonable for us to expect that all of a sudden next week we're out of the woods.’
      • ‘Authorities are making sure that they emphasize the fact that they're not out of the woods.’
    put the wood in the hole
    Northern English
    • Close the door.

      • ‘Can someone please put the wood in the hole!!! It's flippin' freezing’
    touch wood
    British
    • Said after a confident or positive statement, to express a hope for one's good luck to continue.

      • ‘I haven't been banned yet, touch wood’

      Origin

      With reference to the custom of touching something wooden to ward off bad luck.

Origin

Old English wudu, from a Germanic word related to Welsh gwŷdd ‘trees’.