Definition of xerography in English:

xerography

Pronunciation /ziˈräɡrəfē/ /zɪˈrɑɡrəfi/

noun

  • A dry copying process in which black or colored powder adheres to parts of a surface remaining electrically charged after being exposed to light from an image of the document to be copied.

    ‘The process, later renamed xerography (dry writing), used electrostatic energy to transfer dry ink to a page.’
    • ‘‘The more you understand about xerography,’ pioneering Xerox engineer Bob Gundlach tells Owen, ‘the more you are amazed that it works.’’
    • ‘Had he not conceived of xerography, the plain paper copier might have remained un-invented for decades.’
    • ‘Most current photocopiers use a technology called xerography, a dry process using heat.’
    • ‘In 1937, the process called Xerography was invented by American law student Chester Carlson.’