Definition of Yazidi in English:

Yazidi

nounplural noun Yazidi, plural noun Yazidis, plural noun Yezidis

(also Yezidi)
  • A member of a Kurdish-speaking people living chiefly in Iraq, Syria, Armenia, and Georgia and adhering to an ancient monotheistic religion.

    ‘many Yazidis have recently moved to villages further west’
    • ‘Karim is a Yazidi, a member of an ancient religious minority’
    • ‘"I still don't know what happened to him," said Shamu, a 30-year-old Yazidi.’
    • ‘"There needs to be a place for the Christians, the Yazidis, the Assyrians and many, many others," he said.’
    • ‘The strongest punishment among Yazidis is expulsion, which means that your soul is lost forever.’
    • ‘Didn't Gurdjieff claim to have been taught by the Yezidi?’
    • ‘The mystical cult centre of the Yezidi is the Sephira Yesod or Yezod, the sphere of the moon, which is especially concerned with transformation.’
    • ‘Yezidi across the world number between 400,000 and 800,000.’
    • ‘The Yezidi honour sacred trees.’
    • ‘His time with the Yezidis is not well-documented and there are lots of stories about the specifics, some of which are pretty fantastic.’
    • ‘To sum up, the Yezidis' conception of a personal God is transcendental and static of the extreme type.’

Pronunciation

Yazidi

/yəˈzēdē/ /jəˈzidi/

adjective

(also Yezidi)
  • Denoting or relating to the Yazidi.

    ‘a Yazidi village’
    • ‘the Yezidi religion’
    • ‘There are other Yazidi communities in Europe, Russia, Syria and Turkey.’
    • ‘The remaining people are divided into several ethnic groups, including Assyrian, Turkoman, Chaldean, Armenian, Yazidi, and Jewish.’
    • ‘He travelled in the Kurdish regions of northern Iraq, including the Yazidi region of Jabal Sinjar in the north-west, producing over 1,200 photographs.’
    • ‘She had a background in the Kurdish Yazidi faith.’
    • ‘There's not a lot of reliable info on Yezidi beliefs.’
    • ‘I had been hearing about the Yezidi people who live in villages near Dohuk.’
    • ‘The hierarchical orders of the Yezidi sect are four.’
    • ‘In fact the modern Yezidi religion, practiced by over 500,000, people embraces traditions that date back to the Bronze Age.’
    • ‘He grew up in a family of Yezidi Kurds in Tbilisi.’
    • ‘Mr. Rhodes noted his admiration for the resilience of the Yezidi community, which has endured for so many centuries.’
    • ‘And let us celebrate New Year with our Yezidi sisters and brothers.’

Pronunciation

Yazidi

/yəˈzēdē/ /jəˈzidi/

Origin

Ottoman Turkish Yezidi and Persian Yazīdī, probably from the name of Yazīd b. Mu‘āwiya (644–83), the second caliph of the Umayyad dynasty, who is venerated by Yazidis as a founding figure of the religion.