Definition of zebra in English:

zebra

Pronunciation /ˈzēbrə/ /ˈzibrə/

Translate zebra into Spanish

noun

  • 1An African wild horse with black-and-white stripes and an erect mane.

    Genus Equus, family Equidae: three species, the common zebra (E. burchellii), Grevy's zebra (E. grevyi), and the mountain zebra (E. zebra). See also quagga

    ‘The Cape Colony extended systematic protection to elephants, giraffes, hippopotami, buffalo, zebras, quaggas and antelopes in 1886.’
    • ‘This family, made up of the horses, asses and zebras, contains one genus with nine species.’
    • ‘The route of the safari will allow visitors to see for themselves a wide variety of African wildlife including lions, rhinos, giraffes, zebras, chimpanzees and many other species.’
    • ‘Horses, zebras and donkeys are probably descended from an equine (horse-like) kind, since they can interbreed, although the offspring are sterile.’
    • ‘Madagascar's landscape may not be a bad fit for lions, giraffes, zebras, and hippos.’
    • ‘The western part of Kenya's largest national park boasts the Mzima crystal springs, a haven for hippos, elephants, gazelles, zebras, and giraffes.’
    • ‘Seti thought that Vortas' hair was reminiscent of a zebra except with black-and-purple stripes instead of a zebra's black-and-white stripes.’
    • ‘Towards the west end of the zoo were a number of large paddocks, home to zebras, deer, horned oryx and Przewalski wild horses.’
    • ‘Of all the wild equines in the world today, only the plains zebras of Africa are present in large numbers.’
    • ‘Like all equids, mountain zebras are polygynous.’
    • ‘In Australia, kangaroos occupy the position held on other continents by grass eaters such as antelope, deer, zebra, and bison.’
    • ‘A good idea is to board the little train which encircles the zoo enclosure and allows you to see the giraffes, hippos, zebra, camels and rhinos.’
    • ‘Horses and zebras, for example, can interbreed but no one considers them the same species.’
    • ‘A zebra or horse without a hoof is a sitting duck for predators.’
    • ‘Aardvarks, rabbits, zebras, and other animals that rely on a more sedentary diet opt for eyes on each side of the head, maximizing their ability to spot lurking dangers.’
    • ‘So are zebras just horses that leaned on wet painted fences?’
    • ‘You'll get up close to the wildlife, including giraffe, zebra, impala and wildebeest, and all riding abilities are catered for, including beginners.’
    • ‘Burchell's zebras will mate with donkeys, producing a hybrid that has been called a ‘zebdonk.’’
    • ‘The preserve is home to elephants, giraffes, zebra, and various species of antelope and monkey.’
  • 2A large butterfly with pale stripes on a dark background.

    a yellow and black American butterfly (Heliconius charitonius, subfamily Heliconiinae, family Nymphalidae)

    ‘The refuge provides shelter and habitat for more than 300 butterfly species, including the zebra longwing, pipevine swallowtail, julia, and Mexican blue wing.’
    • ‘The zebra longwing butterflies entertained me and a lot of other folks that summer and fall.’
  • 3

    (also zebra fish)
    South African A silvery-gold sea bream with vertical black stripes.

    Diplodus cervinus, family Sparidae

    ‘He brought to our attention the tiny zebra fish which could fully regenerate even severely damaged myocardium.’
    • ‘It is a blending of DNA from a zebra fish and either a jellyfish or sea anemone.’
    • ‘The company screens compounds for medical uses using zebra fish embryonic cells and fruitflies.’
    • ‘I was bored with photographing co-operative green turtles, so I turned to barracuda, batfish, groupers and a lone zebra lionfish.’
  • 4US informal A person whose characteristic garb is a black-and-white striped uniform, especially a football official or a convict.

    • ‘Chad Brown, a boy hell-raiser turned football player turned NFL zebra, now plays the toughest position on the field.’

Origin

Early 17th century from Italian, Spanish, or Portuguese, originally in the sense ‘wild ass’, perhaps ultimately from Latin equiferus, from equus ‘horse’ + ferus ‘wild’.